Lingula anatina

Lingula anatina and other Lingulid brachiopods represent a group of organisms that have a fossil record stretching back over 500 million years to the earliest parts of the Palaeozoic.

Species detail

Lingula anatina is often cited as an example of a living fossil; an organism that has hardly changed over geological time. However, this may no longer be the case as new evidence comes to light from palaeotological studies.

The organophosphatic shell of Lingula anatina is the primitive condition for the Brachiopoda and as such represents one of the first innovations in biomineralization by any animal. The shell itself has a high organic component along with the inorganic phosphatic component.

  • Lingula anatina fossil
    Taxonomy

    Learn about the taxonomy of Lingula anatina, including why it is regarded as the most primitive of the brachiopods.

  • World map showing the distribution of Lingula anatina.
    Habitat and distribution

    Discover the types of environment that Lingula anatina lives in and the areas around the world that it can be found.

  • Lingula anatina fossil
    Biology

    The organophosphatic shell of Lingula represents one of the first innovations in biomineralization by any animal. Find out more about the biology of Lingula anatina.

  • Behaviour

    Learn more about the behaviour of L.anatina how it feeds and creates burrows to survive.

  • Lingula anatina
    References

    Find references regarding Lingula anatina.

Images

Lingula anatina

Lingula is often cited as an example of a living fossil, an organism that has hardly changed over geological time.

Lingula anatina fossil

Linguliformean brachiopods represent the first certain appearance of brachiopods in the fossil record.

Lingula anatina fossil

The Lingula anatina shell has a high organic component along with the inorganic phosphatic component.

World map showing the distribution of Lingula anatina

World map showing the distribution of Lingula anatina.

Author

Lee Davies
Recent Brachiopods research project
Palaeontology Department

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