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2173 Views 3 Replies Last post: Jun 22, 2010 9:56 PM by soniaclarke RSS
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Jun 22, 2010 5:08 PM

Moth Identification

Hi, today I have noticed these two moths in my garden.  I am not sure what they are but they are in a very precarious position, hanging from the arm of one of my sun loungers, they have been there all day.  When I touched the arm of the chair the bottom moth spread its wings and I saw the eye shaped pattern, but apart from that they have not moved all day.

 

Does anyone know what they are and how long they are likely to hang there?  Would be pleased and grateful to know.

 

Thank you, Sonia

 

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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 22, 2010 7:26 PM (in response to soniaclarke)
    Re: Moth Identification

    They're beautiful aren't they?

    I'm no moth expert, but they look like the Eyed Hawk-moths (Smerinthus ocellata). Large blue / black eye spots are revealed when disturbed, as you describe. I'm not sure how long they'll be there, but as they are nocturnal moths, they may get going under the cover of darkness!

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    • Currently Being Moderated
      Jun 22, 2010 5:39 PM (in response to Gill Stevens)
      Re: Moth Identification

      Just a bit of info about hawk-moths from our website......

      Hawk-moths include some of the largest moths to occur in the UK, with wingspans of 10cm or more. They are called hawk-moths because of their rapid flight and the ability of some species to hover. While most hawk-moths are only active at night, some are day fliers. A total of seventeen species are found in the UK of which nine residents and 8 are immigrants, though some of the immigrants also regularly breed in the UK.

      The caterpillars of hawk-moths are usually distinguished by having a pointed horn at the rear end. The habit of some species of rising in a sphinx-like posture when at rest has given the group the scientific name Sphingidae.

      Despite the formidable appearance of some of the larger moths and caterpillars, they are all quite harmless.

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