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789 Views 13 Replies Last post: Jan 31, 2014 1:52 PM by MikeHardman RSS
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Jan 14, 2014 5:38 PM

possible jellyfish?

hi this was found on roker beach near newcastle  i have often wondered if it s a fossil jellyfish but i am probably compleatly wrong would love some help identifiying what it is, thanks.

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    Jan 14, 2014 6:12 PM (in response to starburst1812)
    Re: possible jellyfish?

    Nice find starburst1812

     

    It it is very hard to ID because it's very fade, but my best guess would be some kind of fossil coral or Bryozoa.  It could be a jellyfish, but it isn't my strong point so I'm not sure.

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    Jan 14, 2014 9:59 PM (in response to starburst1812)
    Re: possible jellyfish?

    Got to say starburst i thought i was going to see a coral but your specimen has left me thinking!

    How big is it? and do you think it is fossil wood?

    Possible sponge!

     

    Tabfish

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          Jan 15, 2014 9:52 PM (in response to starburst1812)
          Re: possible jellyfish?

          You can see were a central stem has been attached so is it part of a sea lilly?

           

          Tabfish

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            Jan 15, 2014 10:26 PM (in response to Tabfish)
            Re: possible jellyfish?

            Challenging...

             

            Just to throw another idea up for grabs...

            I wonder if it might be a recent mark caused by a blast (thinking quarrying operations), the 'core' being the end of the drill-hole, and the radiating marks being damage caused by the explosion (as the now-absent rock containing the hole shattered).

             

            Mike

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          Jan 16, 2014 8:58 AM (in response to starburst1812)
          Re: possible jellyfish?

          Well I'm convinced that this is fossil - of crinoid, coelenterate or 'other' I couldn’t say, but it looks interesting enough to have a closer look. Could you contact us at ias2@nhm.ac.uk and we can discuss means of getting it to London 

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              Jan 16, 2014 7:46 PM (in response to starburst1812)
              Re: possible jellyfish?

              Excellento!
              Give it some proper scrutiny.

              Keep us posted.

              I want to know.

              The truth is out there!

              Mike

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                Jan 16, 2014 9:43 PM (in response to MikeHardman)
                Re: possible jellyfish?

                I agree Mike.

                Could it be the leaf of a sea bed plant?

                 

                Tabfish

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                    Jan 31, 2014 1:52 PM (in response to starburst1812)
                    Re: possible jellyfish?

                    I see Peter's explanation as another opinion, but one I don't agree with.

                    Of all the (numerous) calcite veins I've ever seen, I'm sure none of them has had such structure. What he's postulating would require an open fracture (if the vein was formed at the same time as the fracture was propagating, I can't see how a radial structure could result; concentric structure, perhaps). If the microenvironment was suitable for calcite precipitation in an open narrow fracture (whereby filling it would form a vein), there would have been countless crystallization nuclei on the surfaces, causing the calcite to grow to fill the fracture without any such radial structure. Also, the small circular feature in the middle needs explanation.

                     

                    I still prefer my 'explosive' explanation. But it is still also just an opinion.

                     

                    When rocks are blasted in quarrying operations, they tend to fail partly along existing weak surfaces, which can include veins and open cracks. As such, it is possible that the surface bearing the markings is a vein surface, which has been scarred by the explosion.

                     

                    Any quarrymen viewing?

                     

                    Mike

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