Skip navigation
1311 Views 11 Replies Last post: Aug 16, 2012 3:50 PM by Jen RSS
Currently Being Moderated

Aug 12, 2012 9:58 PM

Strange web I found in Oxfordshire (please identify)

105_2305.JPGDoes anyone know what could have created these kinds of webs ???105_2287.JPG

  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 13, 2012 10:20 AM (in response to Arilus)
    Re: Strange web I found in Oxfordshire (please identify)

    Not sure if this helps, but on the leaves to the left of the outdoors "web" photo, there appear to be two small caterpillars.  As this web is similar to the ones spun by some moths (for example, ermine moth, but I'm not suggesting this is what it really is!!) it might be worth looking more closely at these for an ID.  

    • Report Abuse
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 13, 2012 12:52 PM (in response to Arilus)
    Re: Strange web I found in Oxfordshire (please identify)

    It looks like it has fallen from a tree above and landed in the rose - is that correct? If so it might be "fluff" from a seeding poplar (I think you call it a catkin in English).

    • Report Abuse
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 13, 2012 6:53 PM (in response to Arilus)
    Re: Strange web I found in Oxfordshire (please identify)

    Hi,

    I agree with Episcophagus that this fluff is the seeds from a Poplar, not only that but an entire inflorescence from a poplar tree rather than just a mass of poplar seeds. The end of the central woody stem of the inflorescence can be seen in the 2nd pic above the edge of the rose leaf, where the white fluff has caught and is partially covering the leaf, and can be followed down through the mass of seeds.

     

    The central woody stem from the inflorescence can be made out in both your photos, as can the cups which held the seeds - like these seen here - especially in the first pic taken indoors. The short fibres from the seeds are also more evident in the first pic.

     

    One way to tell for sure (assuming you still have some to try) is that on gently teasing the mass of fibres apart the poplar seeds would come away in small bundles of short distinct fibres whereas caterpillar silk would come away in long strands, probably stretch and be fairly elastic.

     

    Jen

    • Report Abuse
    • Currently Being Moderated
      Aug 13, 2012 7:04 PM (in response to Jen)
      Re: Strange web I found in Oxfordshire (please identify)

      I tried to write that I thought that an entire inflorescence had fallen down an landed in the rose, I thus called it a catkin. (English isn't my first language, so please excuse) so your reply and my reply(ies) is overlapping (coin...something - I cant find that word). Well, I agree with you as you agree with me .

      • Report Abuse
        • Currently Being Moderated
          Aug 16, 2012 3:50 PM (in response to Arilus)
          Re: Strange web I found in Oxfordshire (please identify)

          Hi,

           

          the curled up leaf-like structures are the seed pods, the actual seeds themselves are tiny and attached to the fibres which act like mini parachutes to allow the seeds to be carried on the lightest of breezes well away from the parent tree, a very clever means of distribution.

           

          This photo shows the pods and seeds just after the pods have split. The greenish leaf-like segments of the pods then go brown and dry as in your specimen. There is an interesting sequence of photos of the maturing pods to seed dispersal here.

           

          Jen

          • Report Abuse

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked by (0)