Skip navigation
1 2 3 ... 5 Previous Next

Whale, dolphin and porpoise strandings

63 Posts authored by: Strandings Officer
0

Not really any more information on this story Peru mass strandings currently around 600 animals. but it's an interesting interview with CNN showing the current situation.

 

I can't get the video to embed as it's CNNs own format but here is the link: http://edition.cnn.com/2012/04/22/world/americas/peru-dead-dolphins/

0

White Orca spotted

Posted by Strandings Officer Apr 23, 2012

You occationally get white whales and dolphins but for obvious reasons they tend to be young (predation). This animals looks like it's a fully grown adult, and is just beautiful!

 

Scientists have made what they believe to be the first sighting of an adult white orca, or killer whale.

 

The adult male, which they have nicknamed Iceberg, was spotted off the coast of Kamchatka in eastern Russia.

 

It appears to be healthy and leading a normal life in its pod.

 

iceberg.jpg

 

 

 

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-17783603

0

I've just downloaded my copy from Amazon, looks very intersesting.

 

 

GetImage.jpg

 

The Sounding of the Whale is a remarkable book, an astounding piece of research that presents subtle, original arguments in a stylish and readable (if sometimes mannered) prose. Burnett's subject is the development of whale science in the 20th century, which takes in the work of zoologists, paleontologists, biological oceanographers, ecologists, neurologists and mathematicians, among others. The individual scientists are brought to life and their work is beautifully contextualised. Burnett shows us the many ties that bound whale scientists, disastrously, to the whaling industry. He also does a wonderful job of placing the science of cetology in its institutional settings, both academic and political

 

Source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/apr/12/david-blackbourn-graham-burnett-whales?newsfeed=true

 

0

The Council of State has introduced a ban on the import of dolphins for entertainment purposes but has rejected a ban on them being kept in captivity, which means that current captive animals won't have to be released.

 

The Liberal Green deputy Isabelle Chevalley has managed to ban the import of dolphins into Switzerland with the help of Sea Shepherd Switzerland and the Swiss Cetacean Society-SCS.

 

Sea Shepherd Switzerland and the Swiss Cetacean Society-SCS have actively supported the Liberal Green deputy Isabelle Chevalley in her Swiss parliamentary motion calling for the ban on the import of dolphins into Switzerland.

 

On the 12th of this month, the Liberal Green deputy Isabelle Chevalley provided members of parliament with a briefing document drawn up jointly with Sea Shepherd Switzerland and the Swiss Cetacean Society.

 

On the 13th of March, following her convincing debate, the deputy succeeded in having her motion on the ban carried with 112 votes for and 60 against.

 

The Council of States then enforced the ban on the import of dolphins into Switzerland, but nevertheless rejected a ban on their captivity. The two associations are concerned by the fate of three dolphins, a mother and her two youngsters who are still being held in captivity in Switzerland’s sole dolphinarium, the  Connyland. This park organised a rave party last November, following which two dolphins died, raising the death toll of dolphins in Switzerland to eight in only three years.

 

The Connyland will reopen on the 31st of March and the show with the three dolphins will resume.

 

 

Direct from the Sea Shpherd website: http://www.seashepherd.org/news-and-media/2012/03/24/victory-for-the-dolphins-in-switzerland-1359

0

There are some very confusing and contradictory stories coming through about the mass strandings going on in Peru. I have done some digging and this seems to be the best source for information https://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/marmam/2012-April/004248.html

 

I’ve highlighted some of the main points below:

 

Numbers are always uncertain in these cases but it sounds like several hundred animals have washed up in the last month, with still more coming in. The strandings have taken place on the southern border of Illescas National Park, in Piura state.

 

Peru strandings.bmp

 

There are 2 species involved, Long beaked common dolphin (Delphinus capensis) and Burmeister’s porpoise(Phocoena spinipinnis).  Unoffical figures put strandings numbers as high at 3000 animals (these figures may be taking a larger area and/or time frame in to account), although these more offical figures show less with dolphins have taken by far the largest hit of around 600 dead animals, with numbers of porpoises being much lower at around 20 animals. They are all in various decomposition states but they all seem to have washed up with in the last 5 weeks.

 

The necropsies performed on site show two main causes of death (although they are waiting for further results, so this isn’t conclusive yet), most of the results seem to be leading towards a potential epidemic outbreak of morbillivirus brucella (which has been linked to many mass stranding events, including in Europe in the 90s) with some animals showing signs of acoustic impact and decompression syndrome.

 

 

 

 

 

In related but other news, the Cape Cod strandings Cape Cod strandings finally easing seems to still be dwindling on (even though the end of the mass stranding has been announced), but sadly still no results.

 

So far no patterns have emerged, but the many lab analyses will take months to complete, we may yet find one.

 

 

 

Source: http://www.ifaw.org/us/news/stranding-update-no-patterns-depleting-resources-yet-teamwork-still-prevails

0

My line manager Brian is currently out picking up a harbour porpoise that live stranded in Essex over the weekend. Thanks to BDMLR,  Rosie and all those at the Wildlives  Rescue Centre for holding the animal for us, I know PM is never the out come you want (when rescue is the alternative) but hopefully we'll be able to find out why it stranded.


We also had a white beaked dolphin strand in Kent, sadly again BDMLR did all they could but couldn't save it so it's over to us. BDMLR have been little stars with this one as they have also delivered the animal to IoZ for post mortem. I'm afraid I don't have any names of the wonderful people that did this as the Project manager was dealing with it (and he's currently in Ireland) but a massive thanks to who ever you are!


(Should just add a quick note to keep the boss happy and say if you find a dead dolphin on the beach, please don't bung it in the back of a car and drive to London. BDMLR marine medics have all been trained and fully understand the health and safty issues involved in moving a cetacean!)

0

You may remember way back in 2010 there was a campaign to rescue Tom and Misha from living in quite diabolical conditions in a small pool in a tourist town in Turkey. Thanks too Born Free Foundation and Turkish NGO Underwater Research Society they were successfully recovered and I'm pleased to report that their rehabilitation is going really well and the team are now hopeful that release will be possible! 

 

 

Jeff explains; "We have had and still do have many obstacles to overcome but, throughout, Tom and Misha have proven to be willing participants. We have been working hard to prepare them for life outside their sea-pen. Building up their fitness and stamina has been a crucial component. Their muscle strength was very weak when they first arrived and they were desperately underweight and lethargic as they had been confined to a ridiculously small and inadequate captive environment. They have since gained weight, their bodies are toned and they are clearly much fitter and stronger".


Misha_and_Tom__c__J_Foster_BFF.JPG


Some of the techniques adopted by the team were first tested during the rehabilitation of  the orca Keiko, star of the Hollywood hit ‘Free Willy’. Jeff recalled, "We ‘cut our teeth’ on Keiko, which was a hugely expensive and ambitious project.  We learned from that experience and this enabled us to go on and successfully release Springer, another orca ."

 

Jeff added, "Tom and Misha are different again, not only because they are a different species but because they have spent years in captivity and have lost a lot of their natural instincts, which is what makes this project so unique and pioneering. One of the challenges has been to change their focus from ‘above water’ and people, to below water and their natural habitat. If we can get Tom and Misha back to the wild, in my view, it will be one of the great release projects of all time."

 

Source: http://www.bornfree.org.uk/campaigns/marine/hisaronu-dolphins/update-march-2012/?&utm_source=express&utm_medium=press&utm_campaign=Hisaronu

 

Also if you have a bit of spare cash, even a fiver, you can donate here: http://www.bornfree.org.uk/shop/acatalog/Dolphin_Rescue.html

 

 

0

This video is quite amazing, I think the thing I find the most amazing in some ways is the way the animals strand themselves. They are just swimming along in a straight line and they don't deviate, then before they know it they are in trouble and the waves are washing them further up the beach.

 

I'm not sure if there are any other videos of dolphins stranding themselves, would be intersested if anyone knows of any.

 

On a side note while I think this is an amazing rescue, I'd be a bit worried about the possible damage done by dragging them by the tail. I understand common dolphins are very heavy (I've had to carry a few in my time), but teaming up into groups of 3-4 people and carrying them would have been a much harder but safer way of doing it! Still, at the end of the day, they got the job done!

 

It was just another day at the beach--or so it seemed till dozens of dolphins suddenly swam in with the surf and got stranded in the sandy shallows. The dramatic video of the stranding in the Brazilian town of Arraial do Cabo--now a YouTube sensation--shows humans rushing to help their fellow mammals, pushing and pulling hard to help the animals reach deeper water.

 

 

 

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/08/dolphin-stranding-in-brazil-triggers-mad-dash_n_1333810.html

0

179 animals in 39 days, that's a lot of work! Things seem to be easing up a bit now though, thank goodness!

 

 

“We saved more of them than we normally do,” she said. “Of the 179 only 71 were found alive and we successfully released 53 so that’s a 75 percent success rate. That was really high. In a great part that’s due to our fantastic volunteers and our ability to get to the animals quickly.”



Read more: Dolphin rescuers glad the tide of Cape Cod strandings is over - - Wicked Local Eastham http://www.wickedlocal.com/brewster/news/x587877869/Dolphin-rescuers-glad-the-tide-of-Cape-Cod-strandings-is-over#ixzz1oROEaORK

 

0

Another species on the edge that is being monitored very closely. I'll be keeping everything crossed that numbers are up...

 

 

Wildlife conservationists will trawl the length and breadth of Brahmaputra and its tributaries for assessing the status of gangetic dolphin population from the first week of February.

 

Guwahati-based biodiversity conservation NGO,Aaranyak, in association with state forest department, will conduct the survey covering the Brahmaputra right from the Assam-Arunachal border to the Indo-Bangladesh border in Dhubri. Also the Brahmaputra's tributaries - Lohit,Dibang, Siang, Subansiri and Kulsi- will be covered in the survey.

 

"We will be covering a distance of about 1,100 km of Brahmaputra and its tributaries for the survey. This time, we will also attempt to go as far upstream of the tributaries in Arunachal Pradesh. By March we will be come out with the findings of our survey," Abdul Wakid, Aaranyak's Gangetic Dolphin Research and Conservation Programme (GDRCP) head, informed. In the 2008 survey by Aaranyak, 264 gangetic dolphins were found in a stretch of 1,031 km of Brahmaputra river system. The population was estimated around 250 in 2005.


ganges_river_dolphin_114116_125619.jpg

 

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/guwahati/Brahmaputra-dolphin-count-to-begin-in-February/articleshow/11682410.cms

0

A bit of an ongoing story here, back in November a dolphin was rescued near Alabama, the area has seen a massive increase in strandings recently, see my previous posts here: Further on the Gulf Coast strandings.

 

Well it appears the dolphin, named Chance is still alive and seems to be healing well although still has a long way to go. Sadly the write up doesn't tell us much about the strandings which have now been declared a "Unusual Mortality Event."


GULFPORT, Mississippi -- A nearly dead dolphin found in Alabama in November is recovering at the Institute for Marine Mammal Studies and yielding data that may help explain 630 dolphin strandings that have occurred in the northern Gulf of Mexico since February 2010.

 

Moby Solangi, director of the institute, said he is not at liberty to talk about details of what has been discovered as the dolphin named "Chance" has been nursed back from the brink of death after being rescued Nov. 24 from near a marsh at Fort Morgan.

 

"What we can say is it has revealed some significant information," Solangi said.

 

"Finding this live dolphin was like finding the black box from an airplane after a crash," he said.

 

 

dolphin-chance-food-b95bcd8b0fab52a5.jpg

 

Source: http://blog.gulflive.com/mississippi-press-news/2012/01/dolphin_found_in_alabama_is_yi.html

 

 

 

Massive fingers crossed for Chance and I hope they can work out whats happening and put an end to it soon!

0

Sorry for the long break in updates, the New Year is always a bit of a crazy time with the previous years data needing to be sorted and validated. There will be a report, which will head over to Defra probably sometime around April, then hopefully I'll be able to post up some of the main points of 2011's strandings up here shortly after that.

 

And more dolphin related news, some interesting interspecies behaviour for you all!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source with interesting write up: http://animalwise.org/2011/12/14/an-uplifting-dolphin-story-literally/

0

Watch our project leader doing a post mortem on a common dolphin.

 

THIS IS NOT FOR THE FAINT HEARTED!!

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/video/2011/dec/16/watch-postmortem-beached-dolphin-video

0

Woo!

 

I particularly like this bit ‘"The porpoises have found a way to not only avoid the ships, but it's also the noise they make," says Keener.

 

Harbor porpoises haven't been seen in San Francisco Bay for more than 60 years. But now, they're coming back through the Golden Gate in growing numbers and researchers are trying to understand why they’re returning.

 

 

 

 

 

The best place to look for them is 220 feet above the water on the pedestrian walkway across the Golden Gate Bridge. That's where Bill Keener of Golden Gate Cetacean Research photographs them, holding a massive telephoto lens over the side of the railing.

 

 

 

"There's a porpoise right there, coming very, very close," he says pointing. A dark shape appears in the water. It's a harbor porpoise, coming up for air. "And here's a mother and calf coming straight at us."

 

 

Porpoise-11-300x168.jpg

 

Source: http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2011/12/05/after-60-years-porpoises-return-to-san-francisco-bay/

 

0

Another pick up

Posted by Strandings Officer Dec 8, 2011

A little while ago CSIPs head honcho Rob went to Devon to get a dolphin and came back with 3 5 post mortem animals for 2 trips this time he went and only came back with the one, standards are obviously dropping (just joking boss!).

 

We got wind of a live strandings over the weekend from BDMLR, the local coastguard and one of my favourite volunteers David J. Despite some local surfers staying in the water with the common dolphin for what sounds like hours, the local vet had to make the hard decision to put the animal down. I know everyone on the scene worked really hard to keep the animal alive and were understandably disappointed at the outcome. It’s not the perfect end to the story but hopefully our post-mortem will help answer some questions about why the animal had to die.

 

David J just emailed me this picture of one of the guys trying to save the dolphin, such a shame it didn't work out.

 

1-11-2011- to 6-12-2011 290.JPG

1 2 3 ... 5 Previous Next