Skip navigation

Nightshades: the paradoxical plants

2 Posts tagged with the breeding tag
0

Human beings depend upon a handful of flowering plants for 80% of their caloric intake - this in spite of the estimated approximately 400,000 species of flowering plants! In the face of discussions and concerns about global food security, agriculture's attention is turning to the wild species that are related to these staple crops for ideas about how to face massive environmental change.

 

For the past few days, I have been at a meeting convened by the Global Crop Diversity Trust (http://www.croptrust.org/) and funded by a variety of organisations to discuss the challenges and opportunities wild relatives of crops represent. Now, my take on these plants is very firmly from the biodiversity end of the spectrum - and is pretty narrowly focused on Solanaceae, so these few days have been a real learning experience! The group includes people working on rice, maize and wheat, but also apples, barley, amaranthus, soybean, peanut - you name it, the crop is there!  The place is also fantastic - the Asilomar Conference Center on the Monterey peninsula in central California - what better place to come together and leave day-to-day cares behind to really talk about issues.

 

IMG_4770.JPG

The view of the Pacific Ocean (very cold!!) from Asilomar State Park

 

What has surprised me is the degree to which the world of germplasm banks (sort of museums for the seed and plant collections used by plant breeders to improve our crop plants) is parallel to, but rarely intersecting with, my more familiar museum world. Databases are an issue, the avalanche of data coming from genomic approaches .... we all have these same challenges! We could do a lot to help one another, and to see how the challenges we face are actually the same at their core, with subtle differences depending on the specific circumstances.

 

I feel incredibly privledged to have been invited to be a part of this group - and realise how relevant the data we hold in our rich and global collections can be used to help other communities ....  however distant those might be.

 

Solanaceae - my nightshades - have as members many important vegetable crops - tomato, potato, pepper, eggplant (aubergine).... vegetables are often left out of the equation in terms of food security, where focus is on the big grain crops that provide our carbohydrates. But vegetables are key to a balanced diet - vitamins and nutrients are key to human health.  Vegetablse are also locally adapted and consumed, providing a unique opportunity for linking local and global issues, and for linking food prduction to biodiversity issues.

 

My brain is buzzing with new ideas and possible new projects for the future....  at museums we often get bogged down in the enormity of our task, describing wild diversity and enablign its conservation, such that the sheer massive usefulness of the informationfrom our collections we hold and curate for future generations to biology beyond the museum walls can slip into the background. Getting out into communities very different from our own can be scary (lots of words I don't know were bandied about these few days!!) but it is critical for realising the role the Museum can play - its big, and a bit frightening, and very different - but oh so exciting!.

 

Getting out is GOOD!!

 

IMG_4761.JPG

Sunset over the Pacific.....

0

Sandy and Tiina, in Montfavet, near Avignon, France 

 

We had a small diversion in our sporting calendar to the south of France; we were invited to participate in a meeting convened by the Global Crop Diversity Trust (http://www.croptrust.org/) to discuss how the diversity of eggplant wild relatives could be conserved. The eggplant or aubergine is a species of SolanumSolanum melongena, and although not very physically similar to potato (Solanum tuberosum) or tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) it does have genetic similarities.

 

We worked hard, our days were not quite as physically demanding as those in the Tour de France ascent of the nearby Mont Ventoux (left out of the 2012 Tour), but we made a lot of progress! One fascinating fact is that in English, French biologists refer to our vegetable aubergine as the eggplant – just goes to show how language exchange can be pretty random!

 

Christine Daunay of INRA (http://www.international.inra.fr/), Jaime Prohens of the Universitat Politècnica de València (http://www.upv.es), Hannes Dempewolf of the Trust along with Tiina and I talked about the taxonomy of wild eggplants (based on the work of Maria Vorontsova), the state of seed collections of wild eggplants and what eggplant breeders need to improve the crop, especially in the face of climate change.

 

Despite its importance as a world crop, the community of plant breeders working on eggplant are few and far between – it is clear from the meeting that future collaboration with colleagues in India and China – the home of eggplant domestication – will be critical. The wild relatives of the crop are from Africa and future collecting to understand their ranges and environmental tolerances will be important for eggplant improvement. This is where the world of taxonomy intersects with the world of plant breeding and agriculture – knowledge from wild relatives can really help with problems faced by those in agriculture, not just in terms of genes that can be introduced into crops from wild relatives, but in understanding adaptation to different environments and habitats.

 

Our colleague Christine keeps a collection of seeds of wild relatives of eggplants, and we toured her fields and greenhouses – reminding us that Solanum species are more amazing than imaginable – truly paradoxical plants!

 

We returned to London and Edinburgh via TGV (Train à Grand Vitesse – and it is really fast!) through the French countryside and came back to an excited Britain – lots had happened while we were deep in discussing food. Time to catch up with all the other action!

Kuva1.jpg