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Field work with Nature Live

2 Posts tagged with the hydrothermal_vent tag
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Helena-Wiklund.jpg

What do you study at the Museum?

I study polychaetes (marine segmented worms), from the deep sea and from whale-falls and hydrothermal vents. Polychaetes are related to earth worms but usually a lot prettier and more colourful. I am describing new species that we discover in the deep sea samples, and I sequence their DNA to see how they are related to each other.

 

The DNA sequences can also be used to study how these worms move around in the sea. It can be useful to know if they can go anywhere else if their current habitat becomes inhospitable or if they're stuck in one place and doomed when bad things happen.

 

What are you most excited about finding/seeing on the trip?

If we get those whale bones up from the sea floor, I am sure that there are undescribed worm species on them. I am very curious to see what they look like, and also to bring them back to the lab and sequence their DNA to see where they belong among the other worms from similar habitats.

 

Where have you been previously on field work?

In my undergraduate studies I spent one year on Svalbard studying Arctic Biology, and we went on several field trips both on sea and on land. And then I've been to New Zealand, Chile and on an expedition to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and on several expeditions at sea back home in Sweden.

 

What is your favourite thing about going on field work?

My favourite thing is getting the samples! It's a lot like looking for treasure; whenever the sampling gear comes aboard we're all very excited to see what is brought up with it. Even a heap of mud can cause quite a shuffle when everybody wants to see what's in it and pick out the things they work on.

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Leigh-Marsh.jpg

What do you study?

I am studying for a PhD at the University of Southampton, based at the National Oceanography Centre, but I work with colleagues at the Natural History Museum. I use video footage taken by a remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) to study animals that live at hydrothermal vents.

 

What are you most excited about seeing/finding on the trip?

Taking REX into the Blue Hole. Who knows what we will find 200m down…

 

Where have you been previously on field work?

I have worked in the North Sea, English Channel and the Antarctic, so I am looking forward to working somewhere hot for a change!

 

What is your best experience whilst on field work?

Being one of the first people to see the hydrothermal vents in the Antarctic. They're not easy to find, but we managed to discover two new vent fields. This new discovery yielded several new species to science, including the much talked about 'Hoff crab'.

 

Is anything worrying you about the trip?

Working with electronics and water is always a risky business! Let’s hope everything is plugged in and water-tight!

 

What advice would you give to someone going on field work for the first time?

Take your favourite tea bags and your own mug!

 

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That's it for today - tomorrow we'll meet the rest of the team.