References

  • Archer, M. 1994. Velvet Worms: non-missing missing links. Australian Natural History 24: 68-69.
  • Borrer Closs, L. (2005). The effects of silviculture regeneration burns on the habitat of the giant velvet worm (Tasmanipatus barretti). MSc thesis, Imperial College, London.
  • Fox, J. Mesibov, R. & McCarthy, M. (2004) Giant velvet worm (Tasmanipatus barretti). In : Linking landscape ecology and management to population viability analysis, pp71-91. Unpublished project for Forestry Tasmania.
  • Grove, S. Yee, M. & Borrer Closs, L. (2008) Tailoring forest management to the habitat needs of the giant velvet worm. In: T. Lefroy, K. Bailey, T. Norton & G. Unwin, ed. Biodiversity: Integrating Conservation and Production. Collingwood: CSIRO Publishing, 2008, Ch. 19.
  • (31) Horner, D.J. (1995) The ecology of two parapatric species of Tasmanipatus (Onychophora) T. barretti and T. anophthalmus. BSc honours, University of Tasmania, Hobart.
  • Meggs, J.M. (1996) Pilot study of the effects of modern logging practices n the decaying log-habitat in wet eucalypt forests in south-east Tasmania. Unpublished report for Australian Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry.
  • Mesibov, B. (1990) Velvet worms: A special case of invertebrate fauna conservation. Tasforests, 2, 53-56.
  • (16) Mesibov, R (1988) Log Invertebrate Project. Unpublished report to Forestry Tasmania.
  • Mesibov, R. (2001) Giant velvet worms (Tasmanipatus barretti) and plantations. Unpublished report for the project Linking landscape ecology and management to population viability analysis.
  • Tasmanian Velvet Worms
  • Yee, M. Tuan, Z.Q. & Mohammed, C. (2001) Not just waste wood: decaying logs as key habitats in Tasmania’ wet sclerophyll Eucalyptus oblique production forests: the ecology of large and small logs compared. Tasforests, 13(1), 119-123.
  • Yee, M. Grove, S.J. & Borrer Closs, L. (2007). Giant velvet worms (Tasmanipatus barretti) and postharvest regeneration burns in Tasmania. Ecological Management and Restoration 8(1), 66–71.