Specimens

Roger Lincoln and Phil Rainbow

Take a glimpse behind the scenes of the Natural History Museum at some of the millions of specimens held in its collections, and find out why they are still so important to scientists today.

ISBN:
978 0 565 09178 1
Format:
Hardback
Price:
£5.95
Published:
September 2003
Size:
140 x 150 mm
Extent:
64 pp
Illustrations:
Colour throughout
Publisher:
Natural History Museum

Details

From the seventeenth century onwards waves of natural history collectors set out from many countries to different parts of the world to discover what animals were out there. Some of these specimens were preserved in alcohol in natural history collections around the world for scientists to study and marvel at. These collections are continually added to today. Why are they kept? What do scientists learn from them? How are they used? And what is the link with the Earth Summits and global sustainable development?

Specimens answers all these questions and more in a lively and informative story about these specimens, their history, their use and their preservation. Illustrated with startling and awe-inspiring images of a selection of the 22 million 'wet' specimens housed at the Natural History Museum's Darwin Centre, this is both a photographic and science encounter.

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Authors

Phil Rainbow has been the Keeper of Zoology at the Natural History Museum since 1997, after more than twenty years as a don at the University of London. He is a marine biologist, with particular research interests in barnacles and other crustaceans, heavy metals, and tropical marine habitats such as mangrove swamps.

Roger Lincoln joined the Zoology Department at the Natural History Museum in 1969 after completing his PhD. He went straight into the Crustacea Section and began work on the taxonomy and systematics of amphipods and isopods - the groups that were to become his long-term specialism. He was Collections Leader and Deputy Head of Department in Zoology prior to his retirement in 2002 and had a close involvement in the design and development of the new Darwin Centre.

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