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409 Views 10 Replies Last post: Aug 9, 2018 9:38 PM by Steve84 RSS
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Jun 16, 2018 10:38 PM

Fossil ID

I found some decent fossils on Eathie Beach Cromarty Scotland. The first i know is an ammonite the second is some type of fish but i cant tell which one can anyone help me?

  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 18, 2018 10:02 PM (in response to Steve84)
    Re: Fossil ID

    Hi Steve - welcome to NaturePlus

     

    Well done!

    Nice Jurassic ammonite and vertebrate bones.

    I have requested internal NHM expert comment.

    Be patient...

    Thanks

     

    Capture.JPG

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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 18, 2018 9:57 PM (in response to Steve84)
    Re: Fossil ID

    I think this looks fishy rather than anything else,  but we shall see!

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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 18, 2018 10:17 PM (in response to Steve84)
    Re: Fossil ID

    Did you collect the vertebrate material from bedrock?  If so, please say exactly where, so we can check if Middle Devonian (c.385my) or Upper Jurassic (c.155my). 

     

    A lot happened in the intervening 230 million years so the the Orcadian freshwater lake did not just turn into a marine Jurassic one.

    Capture.JPG

    Capture.JPG

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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 19, 2018 9:13 AM (in response to Steve84)
    Re: Fossil ID

    Yes, the ammonite is Kimmeridgian - those shales are the source rock for many of the offshore oil fields.

     

    You may be interested in this link to the type locality in Dorset: https://www.southampton.ac.uk/~imw/kimfoss.htm

     

    The loose boulders could well have come from the nearby Middle Devonian bedrock - the whole area has a blanket of superficial glacial deposits.

     

    The NHM officer who directs such enquiries to the right curator has acknowledged my request and is "on the case"...

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      Jun 19, 2018 10:32 PM (in response to Dr T)
      Re: Fossil ID

      A good find indeed and nice to see the bone exposed plus some nice teeth. Not sure what the piece of bone with what look like broken off teeth and sockets is.

       

      A few of us were discussing Eathie at the Friends of Hugh Miller events in Edinburgh at the weekend, in that nodules from Eathie can be confusing in that you can find loose limestone nodules on the beach of both Devonian and Jurassic age. These nodules have weathered out of their respective matrices and end up in the rocky shingle on the beach together. The Jurassic nodules are often broken with pieces of ammonite and the Devonian nodules with bits of fish.

       

      What is also interesting is that NHM holds a pterosaur bone from Eathie found in 1850 (at which time Hugh Miller was still alive), see link below. It is in shale next to an ammonite!

       

      http://data.nhm.ac.uk/dataset/collection-specimens/resource/05ff2255-c38a-40c9-b657-4ccb55ab2feb/record/483642

       

      Looking forward to the expert opinion!

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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 20, 2018 5:44 PM (in response to Steve84)
    Re: Fossil ID

    Dear Steve84,

     

    Yes, a fantastic find!

     

    From the photos, the specimen seems to be a Devonian fish. Dr. Zerina Johanson, who specialises in early vertebrate evolution, is not certain but she thinks that the "relatively large symphyseal tooth looks a bit a rhizodont" with our specialist Dr. Charlie Underwood agreeing:  "the robust skull and large fang would suggest some sort of Devonian sarcopterygian fish"

     

    The specimen is of potential scientific importance. It would be possible due to the 3D nature of the fossil to make a detailed CT scan of the original bone structure - a glimpse at the structure of these rare fossil fish.The museum would be interested in acquiring your specimen if you are interested.

     

    Thanks,

    Ben

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