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Identification

January 19, 2015
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SPECIMEN LABELS are very important because they provide information that will help with identification and provide useful scientific data (without this information specimens have not scientific value). Please feel free to adapt the specimen labels in the document attached

 

TIPS

1. Print specimen labels before you visit a locality, this will make collecting quicker and easier.

  • You can adapt the specimen labels attached and insert your name to save time and effort.What to include?
  • exact location: name of beach/field/garden/farm
  • Was it loose on the ground or dug up?
  • name of town
  • county
  • country

 

2. If you don't have a label, even a scrap of paper will do ....(I have inserted bus and train tickets which show the date and destination).


3. Keep specimen labels, a pencil and notebook handy along with plastic bags so you can wrap and label your specimens as soon as you find them.

 

4. Newspaper is very useful for wrapping specimens, which also prevents them drying out too quickly

 

 

THE FOSSIL COLLECTOR'S TOOLKIT:Always follow the Geological Code
THE FOSSIL COLLECTOR'S TOOLKIT:
  • hand lens
  • notebook, pencil and marker pen
  • newspaper for wrapping specimens, which also prevents them drying out too quickly
  • appropriate footwear and clothing
  • long-handed trowel, fork, long shoe-horn for overturning small nodules
  • camera
  • First Aid kit
  • hygienic wipes
  • water and a snack!

 

A hammer is useful, but do remember to wear goggles when splitting rocks.

Brushes and a sieve can be useful to avoid carrying unnecessary sand or clay

 

 

Always follow the Geological Code: http://www.rockwatch.org.uk/geological_code.html

The Scottish code may be found: http://www.scottishgeology.com/where-to-go/fossil-collecting/fossil-code/

 

Consider all aspects of heath and safety regarding the site and also from your perpective and the people with you. A useful place for fossil localities, the sorts of fossils that you might find, specific safety considerations and  may be found here. You THere is oftehttp://www.discoveringfossils.co.uk/locations.htm

 

IMPORTANT - Check the times of tides before the visit

 

The essentials of the Scottish Fossil Code:
  • Seek permission – You are acting within the law if you obtain permission to extract, collect and retain fossils.
  • Access responsibly – Consult the Scottish Outdoor Access Code prior to accessing land.

        Be aware that there are restrictions on access and collecting at some locations protected by statute.

  • Collect responsibly – Exercise restraint in the amount collected and the equipment used.
    • Be careful not to damage fossils and the fossil resource.
    • Record details of both the location and the rocks from which fossils are collected.
  • Seek advice – If you find an exceptional or unusual fossil do not try to extract it;
    • but seek advice from an expert.
    • Also seek help to identify fossils or dispose of an old collection.
  • Label and look after – Collected specimens should be labelled and taken good care of.
  • Donate – If you are considering donating a fossil or collection choose an Accredited museum,

                       or one local to the collection area.

 

The Code and associated leaflet may be viewed and downloaded from www.snh.gov.uk. - See more at: http://www.scottishgeology.com/where-to-go/fossil-collecting/fossil-code/#sthash.UjwF72sd.dpuf

hand lens and collecting bag.JPG
Interested in fossils, rocks and minerals and want to get involved?

The Geologists’ Association has its own club for young geologists and families, Rockwatch. For more information: www.rockwatch.org.uk.


More information and useful websites:
http://www.ukge.com/

http://www.discoveringfossils.co.uk/equipment.htm


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Leeds Museum Crinoid Geoblitz.

I thoroughly enjoyed a crinoid Geoblitz (systematic review of crinoids using Geoblitz criteria below) with the curator Neil Owen of Leeds Museum. There were some interesting specimens - I particularly enjoyed seeing the large slab of Woodacrinus crinoids - there were juveniles as well adult crinoids.

 

Stars were given GOLD= High (meets all four of he criteria), Silver and Bronze .

CRITERIA:
  1. Scientific – is of taxonomic or other research importance; including being cited or published.
  2. Historic – associated with a known collector, donor, locality, site, discovery, date or institution; support research in a specific field
  3. Rarity/Uniqueness – internationally, nationally or regionally important; rare in museums collections and/or from an important local or SSSI site
  4. Public Engagement – has an interesting history, has good public engagement potential for display, events or publicity.

GEOBLITZ photo 1 (5) (1).jpg

 

BACKGROUND - Leeds Museum Geology Collection (over 24, 000 Minerals, Rock Types and Fossils from around the world)

The Geology Collection dates back to the 1820’s and has been awarded a “Designated Outstanding Collection” by the Arts Council England.

 

The fossil collection comprises (approx. 12,000 specimens – some were donated from well known collectors:

  • The Ethlered Bennett’s collection of rocks and fossils,
  • Ernest E. Gregory collection of rocks and fossils
  • Cyril P. Castell collection of fossils.

 

What is a Geoblitz? what is the aim?

 

  • To assess the collection and to identify individual specimens, therefore highlight specific key taxa for star grading system.

 

This assessment/identification will be used to enable greater usage/engagement of the collection and promote Star specimens for :

  • Future events
  • Public engagements/Outreach
  • Research.

 

Fiona E. Fearnhead