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Beetle blog

1 Post tagged with the callichromatini tag
4

So all you avid followers of the Beetle Blog will no doubt be very excited to see the mystery beetle so diligently caught with a butterfly net by HT in Tanzania...

 

Cerambycid_tanzaniawebIMGA0286.JPG

Yet again, there appears to be another Chinese laundry bag right of image!

 

So we think this beauty is definitely a longhorn beetle (obviously!), and my money is on Cerambycinae; Callichromatini, possibly close to Ionthodes or Compsomera and MB has this enigmatic comment to add:

'Most African Callichromatini, especially the  common Philematium, have red legs, so the black legs should help; the widening  of the hind tibiae is likely to be helpful, it is also very large. I expect it  smells like a medicine chest!'

 

We haven't really had a proper look in the collection  - perhaps we will wait until the beetle (literally) wings its' way to our collection...unless anyone has anything better to add...?

 

And finally, despite much hardship, and unrelenting torrential downpours we have another video installment from HT in the wilds of Tanzania...enjoy!

 



Blaps

Blaps

Member since: Sep 15, 2009

I'm Beulah Garner, one of the curators of Coleoptera in the Entomology department. The Museum's collection of beetles is housed in 22,000 drawers, holding approximately 9,000,000 specimens. This little collection keeps us quite busy!

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