Wallace Letters Online

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Record number: WCP5328

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Sent by:
Charles Robert Darwin
Sent to:
Joseph Dalton Hooker
On:
15 May 1864

Sent by Charles Robert Darwin, [none given] to Joseph Dalton Hooker [none given] on 15 May 1864.

Record created:
20 May 2013 by Chillingworth, Nancy

Summary

Praises Wallace.

Record contains:

  • letter (1)

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LETTER (WCP5328.5872)

A typical letter handwritten by author in English and signed by author.

Held by:
Cambridge University Library
Finding number:
MS DAR 115: 233
Copyright owner:
©William H. Darwin

Physical description

Transcription information

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Transcript

[[1]]

Sunday May 15/[18]64

My dear Hooker,

We hear that you have returned & that they at Barlaston enjoyed your visit & that you begrimed yourself with old dirty casts. I am to that degree presumptuous that instead of amusing myself by scribbling to you, I most days write a few paragraphs or sentences at my Lythrum paper, which I hope to send to Linn[ean]. Soc[iety]. this session -- Everything comes out very clearly. -- As you are working, you poor wretch, at Melastomas, I suppose you will soon come to Lythraceae; [[2]] in looking at species with large flowers remember different lengths of pistils & stamens & if possible let me see. The Lagerstroemia has flowered with me & by analogy is mid-styled & sh[oul]d have 2 other forms. --

I was very glad to get your last one with good news about Bates' place; but I fear it will send his Nat[ural]. Hist[ory]. papers. By the way what a capital paper that was by Wallace.

Your suggestion about Mr. Bennett [[3]] & Leersia has fructified & I shall get plants when they are up. --

Thanks for the letter from N[orth]. America forwarded to me . --

Your penultimate letter told me much about yourself, which I wished much to hear. --

I have now been more than a month without sickness, but I do not at all rapidly grow strong, & have to go to bed 2 or 3 times per day. -- But it makes a wonderful difference in my life, that I can now occupy myself a little with [[4]] old pursuits & read a little.

Farewell my dear old friend | C. Darwin [signature]

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