Wallace Letters Online

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Record number: WCP5307

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Sent by:
Joseph Dalton Hooker
Sent to:
Charles Robert Darwin
On:
18 December 1879

Sent by Joseph Dalton Hooker, [none given] to Charles Robert Darwin [none given] on 18 December 1879.

Record created:
17 May 2013 by Chillingworth, Nancy

Summary

Hooker argues against Darwin's suggestion that Wallace receive a government pension.

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  • letter (1)

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LETTER (WCP5307.5851)

A typical letter handwritten by author in English and signed by author.

Held by:
Cambridge University Library
Finding number:
MS DAR 104: 136?7
Copyright owner:
Reproduced with kind permission of members of the Hooker family

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Transcription information

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Transcript

[[1]]

Dec[ember] 18/79

Dear Darwin

I have such considered the pros & cons of the proposal to [word illeg.] sympathy in the matter of a [word illeg.] to Wallace, and I greatly doubt its [word illeg.].

Wallace has [word illeg.] [word illeg.] terribly, not [word illeg.] by his adhesion to spiritualism, but by the faith of his having deliberately & [word illeg.] the whole [1 word illeg.] voice of the committee of his [word illeg.] of the British [word illeg.], brought about a [word illeg.] of the on spiritualism at [word illeg.] if its sectional meetings, when he was President of that [word illeg.]...

[[2]] This he is [word illeg.] where [word illeg.] in an underhand manner, & I well remember the [word illeg.] it gave [word illeg.] to [word illeg.] the B.A. Council, & [word illeg.] the numbers at [word illeg.]. In fact it led to our at on a framing rules [1 word illeg.] requiring the [1 word illeg.] consideration of Committee of our papers before they should be read.

Then there is the matter of his taking [word illeg.] the Lunatic's belief about the sphericity of the earth, & predicting the [word illeg.]. There may be two opinions about this, but at any rate there is a prevalent & very strong one. [[3]] What effect that it was honorable to a [word illeg.] was, who was certain of his friend.

I think that under these circumstances it would be very [word illeg.] to ask one's friends to [word illeg.] an [word illeg.] to [word illeg.] for a [word illeg.]. Added to which [word illeg.] would in [word illeg.] be ripened of the [word illeg.] is a [word illeg.] & leading spiritualist! It would never [word illeg.] if an [word illeg.] went [word illeg.] of a [word illeg.] [word illeg.] [word illeg.], there I said that the [word illeg.] would [1 word illeg.] had but [word illeg.] forward & left the [word illeg.] in [word illeg.] of what might have [word illeg.] their [1 word illeg.] decisions [[4]] as to the [word illeg.] of [word illeg.].

Lastly a man [2 word illeg.] not in absolute poverty has little chance;-- & after all Wallace's claim is not that he is in need, no [word illeg.] as that he can't find [word illeg.]

I need not add that had he [word illeg.] against [word illeg.] & that I [word illeg.] reciprocate [word illeg.] [word illeg.] to the [word illeg.] of his early work. & that claim [word illeg.] [word illeg.] a his [word illeg.] gratitude.

I hear such good [word illeg.] of your health.

We think of going to the [word illeg.] In [word illeg.] for X mas [word illeg.].

Ever affectionate | JD Hooker [signature]

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