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Record number: WCP444

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Sent by:
Alfred Russel Wallace
Sent to:
Annie Wallace (née Mitten)
On:
4 May 1887

Sent by Alfred Russel Wallace, Sioux City, Iowa, U.S.A. to Annie Wallace (née Mitten) Nutwood Cottage, Frith Hill, Godalming on 4 May 1887.

Record created:
01 June 2002 by Lucas, Paula J.

Summary

Letter from Alfred Russel Wallace to his wife Annie from Sioux City, 4 May 1887; Stamped envelope addressed to Mrs Wallace Frith Hill Godalming England, annotated [in William Greenell Wallace's hand] on the front 'Sioux City May 4th'; front postmark May but otherwise illegible, back postmarked Godalming 19 May 1887.

Record contains:

  • letter (1)
  • envelope (1)

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LETTER (WCP444.444)

A typical letter handwritten by author in English and signed by author.

Held by:
Natural History Museum
Finding number:
NHM WP1/5/28(1)
Copyright owner:
Copyright of the A. R. Wallace Literary Estate

Physical description

Transcription information

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Transcript

[[1]]

Sioux City,

May 4th, 1887

My dear Annie

I write a few lines now because I shall me [be] moving about for the next week away & may not have time. I give my third lecture here tonight and am going to give two in Kansas, but not having one in California. I do not think I ought to go on as besides the journey there, it will be impossible to come back without seeing the Yosemite valley which will itself cost nearly as much again. I have had a pleasant time here & have been taken out some nice excursions into this very curious & interesting country. I have got some flowers which I am sending off today to Miss Jekyll, so after a few days you can call & see them. There are three sp[ecies] of violets, one very like Viola pedata but I think another sp[ecies] called Viola delphinifolia grown in open places in rich soil. Also some plants of Aquilegia canadensis, & a nice Anemone like our Anemone pulsatilla, and a beautiful [[2]] yellow flowered Uvularia. There are no ferns the country being dry & little shade. I hope to get many more fine plants in Kansas.

It will depend upon what letters I get there whether I go to California or only go to the Rocky M[ountai]ns but there seems little hope of lectures in California. If I have another agent & go another year I should probably get some. As John lives at a town in a flat cultivated country I could not stay there more than a few days as I should want to be in the mountains.

I enclose a list of the plants now sent to care of Miss Jekyll, which you can send or take so in a few days after you receive this. The trunk I bought in London & which was promised to be strong enough to go round the world is giving way at the ends already. The English makers do not know how to make trunks.

[[3]] I enclose a newspaper report of my first lecture here, & a picture for Willie..

I will write again from Kansas giving my future movements.

In haste| Your affectionate Husband | Alfred R. Wallace [signature]

ENDNOTES

1. Annie Mitten Wallace (1810-1832), Wallace's wife

2. Gertrude Jekyll (1843-1932), horticulturist

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