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Record number: WCP415

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Sent by:
Alfred Russel Wallace
Sent to:
Annie Wallace (née Mitten)
On:
[?July] [1895]

Sent by Alfred Russel Wallace, Corfe View, Parkstone, Dorset to Annie Wallace (née Mitten) [address not recorded] on [?July] [1895].

Record created:
01 June 2002 by Lucas, Paula J.

Summary

Re. plans for Annie's father (William Mitten) and Alfred Russel Wallace to tour in Switzerland after her return; expects many rare plants in the mountains, possibility of visiting Pilatus or Stanzenhorn, asks Annie to enquire about hotel rates there, and about a hotel in Lucerne for day of their arrival; regards to Bessie; asks for news of her tour and fellow-travellers; receipt of letter from Miss Jekyll enclosing an enquiry from another correspondent re effect of sea-air on plants at Lyme Regis; mosquitoes at Rhone glacier.

Record notes

Record contains:

  • letter (1)

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LETTER (WCP415.415)

A typical letter handwritten by author in English and signed by author.

Held by:
Natural History Museum
Finding number:
NHM WP1/4/9
Copyright owner:
Copyright of the A. R. Wallace Literary Estate

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Transcript

[[1]]

Parkstone, Dorset.

Saturday Morning

My dear Annie

Soon after your departure a letter from your Pa arrived, saying he could not start till the Friday after your return. So that is settled. I find by my new guidebook that the trains to [the] top of Pilatus do run on Sunday & cheaper! So we can do Pilatus on Sunday, & on Monday leave for the mountains, unless we decide to stay a week on Pilatus. There is another hotel on the top (or near it) called the Klinseuhorn Hotel. This is, I think, rather smaller & cheaper, & when you go to Pilatus you might go there to lunch or get some slight refreshment (soda water etc.) and ask them what they charge by the day, "tout compris", for 2-3 days or a week. I expect there are lots of rose plants on the mountain, & it could not be explored in a week. [[2]] Also do not forget to enquire about a small moderate hotel in Lucerne for us to go to when we get there. One near the station preferred.

When you get this you will suppose be revelling in the glories of Lake Lucerne & the mountains. I see there is another mountain called the Stangerhorn opposite Pilatus to the south-east, an inlet of the lake between them. It is higher than the Rigi but not so high as Pilatus, & has a little railway to top and a hotel; and as it is much less known than the Rigi & Pilatus it is probably cheaper. You can probably see at the chalets, or at Lucerne one directory of [[3]] Hotels, & see whay their prices are for "pension". I expect it would be a delightful place to stay a few days, as the views must be magnificent, and there are sure to be plenty of flowers as part of it is called the Blumatalp.

Let me know if you have had afternoon tea successfully with the lamp & kettle; also how you got through the journey, & all your adventures & what the chalets are like, & what kind of a feast you had with your three meals on Sunday! Also if you have made any acquaintances among your fellow-travellers. Give my love to Bessie, who I hope is enjoying herself [[4]] and likes Switzerland better than Ronan. Tell me also if Violet met you at the station.

I have a letter today from Miss Jekyll enclosing some queries of a gentleman who wants to live at Lyrue Regis & make a garden, & is afraid sea-air is not good for many plants! I think it is good for all plants if they are sheltered from wind. The garden looks & feels beautifully fresh this morning after the rain. Your Pa says there were mosquitoes at the Rhone Glacier when he was there but that was in August & they bit him!! But, as there are plenty of flowers I suppose he will dare the dangers of those infuriated beasts! Hoping you do not find it too hot & humid.

Your ever affectionate | Alfred [signature]

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