Examples of micro-CT applications

Our scientists use Micro-CT to visualise the external and internal structure of biological, mineralogical and man-made objects. 

See how Museum scientists are using the versatility of this non-destructive technique for their research.

  • Still image taken from a micro-CT scan reconstruction of a mummified cat
    Mummified Egyptian cat

    Find out the secrets uncovered by a micro-CT scan of this ancient Egyptian cat mummy.

  • Still image taken from a micro-CT of the rhinoceros beetle, Oryctes boas
    Rhinoceros beetle (Oryctes boas)

    View a micro-CT scan reconstruction of a beetle that demonstrates how the technique can be used to ‘dissect’ specimens to show their internal structure.

  • Still image taken from a micro-CT scan of a goldcrest's skull
    Goldcrest (Regulus regulus) skull

    This tiny bird weighs just 5-6 grams. View a micro-CT scan reconstruction of a specimen's skull.

  • Still image taken from a micro-CT scan of Crossotheca hoeninghausi
    Fossilised seed fern (Crossotheca hoeninghausi) leaf

    This example demonstrates how the micro-CT technique can reveal details of fossils hidden within mineral concretions.

  • Still image taken from a micro-CT scan of a blaschka squid specimen
    Blaschka squid

    Micro CT-scanning can generate fascinating insights into the manufacture and decay of museum objects and help conservators to understand and prevent their deterioration. Find out what it tells us about this glass squid model, made over 100 years ago.

  • Still image taken from a micro-CT scan of a barn owl's skull
    Barn owl (Tyto alba) skull

    Owls posess one of the longest hearing organs of any bird. View a micro-CT scan reconstruction of a barn owl's skull, with the hearing organ revealed.

  • Still image taken from a micro-CT scan of a gerrhonotus
    Northern alligator lizard (Gerrhonotus coeruleus) inner ear

    The micro-CT technique makes it possible to see an organism's internal organs. View the inner ear labyrinth of the northern alligator lizard and find out how this fits with the animal's observed behaviour.

  • Still image taken from a micro-CT scan of allende
    Allende meteorite

    Micro-CT can be used to reveal the different components of a meteorite, giving insights into the conditions of early solar system formation. Find out about the Allende meteorite that fell in Mexico in 1969.

  • Still image taken from a micro-CT scan of Pocillopora coral
    Pocillopora coral

    Coral species of the genus Pocillopora provide an important contribution to reef structures. View a micro-CT scan reconstruction of one of these small corals.

  • ultrabasic rock sample micro-CT scan reconstruction
    Rock core

    Watch a Micro-CT scan reconstruction that demonstrates how the technique can be used to reveal the 3D distribution of different minerals within a rock sample.

  • Stereo-perspective micro-CT reconstruction of a fossil viviparous snail
    Fossil viviparous snail

    Red green stereo-perspective images can be used to fully explore the 3D geometry of an object. View a stereo-perspective image of a fossil viviparous snail.

  • Micro-CT reconstruction of a caecilian, an amphibian
    Caecilian

    Micro-CT reconstructions enable scanned objects to be digitally dissected. View an example where this has been done for a caecilian, an amphibian.

Agapanthus
Micro-CT image competition finalists

Check out the stunning images that made it to finals of our micro-CT image competition 2013.

Micro-CT

X-rays are used to create cross-sections, micrometers wide, of a 3D-object. The information is used to recreate a virtual model without destroying the original model.

Copyright

The Museum retains copyright on all scans of our specimens. Their use is subject to the Museum’s copyright policy on images. All Museum specimen scans will be archived and can be obtained with permission from the collection curator. Stereolithography and 3D printing are not permitted without prior permission from the curator.

Micro-CT

X-rays are used to create cross-sections, micrometers wide, of a 3D-object. The information is used to recreate a virtual model without destroying the original model.