Ms Natalie Dale-Skey

Natalie Dale-Skey
  • Curatorial Assistant, Hymenoptera
  • Life Sciences department
  • Insects
Natural History Museum
Cromwell Road
London
SW7 5BD

Biography

Employment history

Natural History Museum

2011                    Curator (Hymenoptera section)

2010                    Research Assistant (UK Calliphoridae)

2009                    Curatorial Assisant (Diptera section)

2006-2009          Entomology Department Collections Assistant

 

International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN)

2008-present      Bulletin Zoologist

Qualifications  

MSc in Advanced methods in taxonomy and biodiversity, Imperial College London
& Natural History Museum London 
BSc Honours in Natural Sciences with biology (1st class)

Curation

Current responsibilities

Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea, Evanioidea, Megalyroidea, Stephanoidea, Trigonalyoidea

Past curation projects

Re-curation of British Calliphoridae

Curation of a Mycetophilidae collection from Russia

Re-curation of Phanaeini (with Mr Conrad Gillett)

Research

UK Calliphoridae of forensic importance (2010)

(supervised by Martin Hall)

This project gathered information on distribution, seasonality and habitat preferences of British Calliphoridae (a family of flies that includes the primary fauna used as insect evidence in cases of suspicious deaths), using both specimens in the NHM British collection and specimens collected specifically for the study.

All specimens from the NHM British collection were databased, extracting the metadata from their labels. Further specimens were collected from different micro-environments (heaths, grasslands, mires and forests) in the New Forest during a 5 week trapping study. The data obtained will show the relative abundance of different species in different environments, and any consistent site differences could be useful in forensic case work, indicating what species are likely to be encountered on bodies recovered from different habitats

 

Callliphoridae trapping

Calliphoridae trapping study in the New Forest, using modified red-top traps