Dr Tom Booth

Dr Thomas Booth

Postdoctoral Researcher Wellcome Human Adaptation

Department: Earth Sciences
Division: ES Vertebrates and Anthropology Palaeobiology
Phone: 0207942 5321

Specialisms

Ancient DNA, Bone Diagenesis, British Human Prehistory, Funerary Treatment, Taphonomy

Summary

I am currently working as a Post-Doctoral Research Associate on the Wellcome-funded project "Human Adaptation to Diet and Infectious Disease Loads, from the origins of agriculture to the present". My role involves identifying pertinent British archaeological human remains that may provide high-quality on-target DNA. I also research and report on the archaeological context of these samples. My own research is concerned with the microstructural analysis of diagenesis in ancient human bone, particularly the relationship between bioerosion and early post mortem taphonomic processes. This research also has applications to the survival of DNA in ancient bone.

Qualifications

Degrees

PhD, University of Sheffield, United Kingdom, 2010 - 2014

MSc, University of Sheffield, United Kingdom, 2007 - 2008

BSc, University of Sheffield, United Kingdom, 2004 - 2007

Highlighted publications

Booth TJ (2015) An Investigation Into the Relationship Between Funerary Treatment and Bacterial Bioerosion in European Archaeological Human Bone. Archaeometry, n/a - n/a. doi: 10.1111/arcm.12190

Booth TJ, Chamberlain AT, Pearson MP (2015) Mummification in Bronze Age Britain. Antiquity, 89 (347) : 1155 - 1173. doi: 10.15184/aqy.2015.111

Publications

Booth TJ, Madgwick R (2016) New evidence for diverse secondary burial practices in Iron Age Britain: A histological case study. Journal of Archaeological Science, 67 : 14 - 24. doi: 10.1016/j.jas.2016.01.010

Booth TJ (2015) An Investigation Into the Relationship Between Funerary Treatment and Bacterial Bioerosion in European Archaeological Human Bone. Archaeometry, n/a - n/a. doi: 10.1111/arcm.12190

Booth TJ, Chamberlain AT, Pearson MP (2015) Mummification in Bronze Age Britain. Antiquity, 89 (347) : 1155 - 1173. doi: 10.15184/aqy.2015.111

White L, Booth TJ (2014) The origin of bacteria responsible for bioerosion to the internal bone microstructure: Results from experimentally-deposited pig carcasses. Forensic Science International, 239 : 92 - 102. doi: 10.1016/j.forsciint.2014.03.024

Introduction

Summary

I am currently working as a Post-Doctoral Research Associate on the Wellcome-funded project "Human Adaptation to Diet and Infectious Disease Loads, from the origins of agriculture to the present". My role involves identifying pertinent British archaeological human remains that may provide high-quality on-target DNA. I also research and report on the archaeological context of these samples. My own research is concerned with the microstructural analysis of diagenesis in ancient human bone, particularly the relationship between bioerosion and early post mortem taphonomic processes. This research also has applications to the survival of DNA in ancient bone.

Qualifications

Degrees

PhD, University of Sheffield, United Kingdom, 2010 - 2014

MSc, University of Sheffield, United Kingdom, 2007 - 2008

BSc, University of Sheffield, United Kingdom, 2004 - 2007

Highlighted publications

Booth TJ (2015) An Investigation Into the Relationship Between Funerary Treatment and Bacterial Bioerosion in European Archaeological Human Bone. Archaeometry, n/a - n/a. doi: 10.1111/arcm.12190

Booth TJ, Chamberlain AT, Pearson MP (2015) Mummification in Bronze Age Britain. Antiquity, 89 (347) : 1155 - 1173. doi: 10.15184/aqy.2015.111

Publications

Publications

Booth TJ, Madgwick R (2016) New evidence for diverse secondary burial practices in Iron Age Britain: A histological case study. Journal of Archaeological Science, 67 : 14 - 24. doi: 10.1016/j.jas.2016.01.010

Booth TJ (2015) An Investigation Into the Relationship Between Funerary Treatment and Bacterial Bioerosion in European Archaeological Human Bone. Archaeometry, n/a - n/a. doi: 10.1111/arcm.12190

Booth TJ, Chamberlain AT, Pearson MP (2015) Mummification in Bronze Age Britain. Antiquity, 89 (347) : 1155 - 1173. doi: 10.15184/aqy.2015.111

White L, Booth TJ (2014) The origin of bacteria responsible for bioerosion to the internal bone microstructure: Results from experimentally-deposited pig carcasses. Forensic Science International, 239 : 92 - 102. doi: 10.1016/j.forsciint.2014.03.024