Dr Martin Hughes

Dr Martin Hughes

Postdoctoral Researcher, DIF

Department: Life Sciences
Division: LS Vertebrates Division
Phone: 020 7942 5565
http://www.mendeley.com
http://www.researchgate.net

Summary

My research interest involves the quantification and understanding of trends in morphological evolution that manifest above the level of species in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Funded by the Templeton Foundation I am currently employed at the Natural History Museum as a post-doctoral research scientist. My research focus encompasses the subject of convergent evolution of body form. As part of a research team that includes collaborators in the University of Bath I am tackling several important questions relating to convergent morphological evolution: where is convergence most remarkable? How common is homoplasy? Are certain types of characters more prone to convergence? Does the probability of convergence in characters change through evolutionary time? Are the elements of complex, convergent character complexes assembled in the same order?

Qualifications

Degrees

PhD, University of Bath, United Kingdom, 2009 - 2013

MRes, Imperial College London / Natural History Museum, United Kingdom, 2008 - 2009

MSci, University College London, United Kingdom, 2003 - 2007

Highlighted publications

Hughes M, Gerber S, Wills MA (2013) Clades reach highest morphological disparity early in their evolution. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110 (34) : 13875 - 13879. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1302642110

Wills MA, Gerber S, Ruta M, Hughes M (2012) The disparity of priapulid, archaeopriapulid and palaeoscolecid worms in the light of new data. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 25 (10) : 2056 - 2076. doi: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2012.02586.x

Barraclough TG, Hughes M, Ashford-hodges N, Fujisawa T (2009) Inferring evolutionarily significant units of bacterial diversity from broad environmental surveys of single-locus data. Biology Letters, 5 (3) : 425 - 428. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2009.0091

Publications

Oyston JW, Hughes M, Gerber S, Wills MA (2016) Why should we investigate the morphological disparity of plant clades?. Annals of Botany, 117 (5) : 859 - 879. doi: 10.1093/aob/mcv135

Oyston JW, Hughes M, Wagner PJ, Gerber S, Wills MA (2015) What limits the morphological disparity of clades?. Interface Focus, 5 (6) : 20150042 - 20150042. doi: 10.1098/rsfs.2015.0042

Hughes M, Gerber S, Wills MA (2013) Clades reach highest morphological disparity early in their evolution. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110 (34) : 13875 - 13879. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1302642110

Wills MA, Gerber S, Ruta M, Hughes M (2012) The disparity of priapulid, archaeopriapulid and palaeoscolecid worms in the light of new data. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 25 (10) : 2056 - 2076. doi: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2012.02586.x

Barraclough TG, Hughes M, Ashford-hodges N, Fujisawa T (2009) Inferring evolutionarily significant units of bacterial diversity from broad environmental surveys of single-locus data. Biology Letters, 5 (3) : 425 - 428. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2009.0091

Introduction

Summary

My research interest involves the quantification and understanding of trends in morphological evolution that manifest above the level of species in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Funded by the Templeton Foundation I am currently employed at the Natural History Museum as a post-doctoral research scientist. My research focus encompasses the subject of convergent evolution of body form. As part of a research team that includes collaborators in the University of Bath I am tackling several important questions relating to convergent morphological evolution: where is convergence most remarkable? How common is homoplasy? Are certain types of characters more prone to convergence? Does the probability of convergence in characters change through evolutionary time? Are the elements of complex, convergent character complexes assembled in the same order?

Qualifications

Degrees

PhD, University of Bath, United Kingdom, 2009 - 2013

MRes, Imperial College London / Natural History Museum, United Kingdom, 2008 - 2009

MSci, University College London, United Kingdom, 2003 - 2007

Highlighted publications

Hughes M, Gerber S, Wills MA (2013) Clades reach highest morphological disparity early in their evolution. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110 (34) : 13875 - 13879. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1302642110

Wills MA, Gerber S, Ruta M, Hughes M (2012) The disparity of priapulid, archaeopriapulid and palaeoscolecid worms in the light of new data. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 25 (10) : 2056 - 2076. doi: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2012.02586.x

Barraclough TG, Hughes M, Ashford-hodges N, Fujisawa T (2009) Inferring evolutionarily significant units of bacterial diversity from broad environmental surveys of single-locus data. Biology Letters, 5 (3) : 425 - 428. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2009.0091

Publications

Publications

Oyston JW, Hughes M, Gerber S, Wills MA (2016) Why should we investigate the morphological disparity of plant clades?. Annals of Botany, 117 (5) : 859 - 879. doi: 10.1093/aob/mcv135

Oyston JW, Hughes M, Wagner PJ, Gerber S, Wills MA (2015) What limits the morphological disparity of clades?. Interface Focus, 5 (6) : 20150042 - 20150042. doi: 10.1098/rsfs.2015.0042

Hughes M, Gerber S, Wills MA (2013) Clades reach highest morphological disparity early in their evolution. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110 (34) : 13875 - 13879. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1302642110

Wills MA, Gerber S, Ruta M, Hughes M (2012) The disparity of priapulid, archaeopriapulid and palaeoscolecid worms in the light of new data. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 25 (10) : 2056 - 2076. doi: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2012.02586.x

Barraclough TG, Hughes M, Ashford-hodges N, Fujisawa T (2009) Inferring evolutionarily significant units of bacterial diversity from broad environmental surveys of single-locus data. Biology Letters, 5 (3) : 425 - 428. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2009.0091