Dr Louise Ashton

Dr Louise Ashton

Postdoctoral Researcher, NERC BALI

Department: Life Sciences
Division: LS Insects Division
Contact: email
my research website

Specialisms

Canopy, Ecology, Lepidoptera, Termites

Summary

Louise Ashton is a postdoctoral fellow at the Natural History Museum, London. Her research focuses on tropical rainforest biodiversity, climate change impacts on insect communities and understanding the factors shaping community assembly across environmental gradients, primarily using insect herbivores. Recently, her work has focused on ecosystem manipulation experiments to isolate and identify of the drivers of ecological functioning. In the future, Louise aims to use ecosystem manipulation experiments to explore ecological problems, focusing on rainforest canopies and the impacts of human activities.

Qualifications

Degrees

PhD, Griffith University, Australia

Employment history

Academic

Postdoctoral researcher, Natural History Museum, London, Life sciences, UK, 2015 - ongoing

Highlighted publications

Ashton LA, Nakamura A, Basset Y, Burwell CJ, Cao M, et al. (2016) Vertical stratification of moths across elevation and latitude. Journal of Biogeography, 43 (1) : 59 - 69. doi: 10.1111/jbi.12616

Ashton LA, Odell EH, Burwell CJ, Maunsell SC, Nakamura A, et al. (2016) Altitudinal patterns of moth diversity in tropical and subtropical Australian rainforests. Austral Ecology, 41 (2) : 197 - 208. doi: 10.1111/aec.12309

Publications

Ashton LA, Barlow HS, Nakamura A, Kitching RL (2015) Diversity in tropical ecosystems: the species richness and turnover of moths in Malaysian rainforests. Insect Conservation and Diversity, 8 (2) : 132 - 142. doi: 10.1111/icad.12090

Ashton LA, Nakamura A, Basset Y, Burwell CJ, Cao M, Eastwood R, Odell E, De OliveiraEG, Hurley K, Katabuchi M, Maunsell S, Mcbroom J, Schmidl J, Sun Z, Tang Y, Whitaker T, Laidlaw MJ, Mcdonald WJF, Kitching RL (2016) Vertical stratification of moths across elevation and latitude. Journal of Biogeography, 43 (1) : 59 - 69. doi: 10.1111/jbi.12616

Ashton LA, Odell EH, Burwell CJ, Maunsell SC, Nakamura A, Mcdonald WJF, Kitching RL (2016) Altitudinal patterns of moth diversity in tropical and subtropical Australian rainforests. Austral Ecology, 41 (2) : 197 - 208. doi: 10.1111/aec.12309

Nakamura A, Burwell CJ, Ashton LA, Laidlaw MJ, Katabuchi M, Kitching RL (2016) Identifying indicator species of elevation: Comparing the utility of woody plants, ants and moths for long-term monitoring. Austral Ecology, 41 (2) : 179 - 188. doi: 10.1111/aec.12291

Odell EH, Ashton LA, Kitching RL (2016) Elevation and moths in a central eastern Queensland rainforest. Austral Ecology, 41 (2) : 133 - 144. doi: 10.1111/aec.12272

Ashton L (2013) Predictor sets and biodiversity assessment: the evolution and application of an idea.. Pacific Conservation Biology, 19 : 418 - 426.

Ji Y, Ashton L, Pedley SM, Edwards DP, Tang Y, Nakamura A, Kitching R, Dolman PM, Woodcock P, Edwards FA, Larsen TH, Hsu WW, Benedick S, Hamer KC, Wilcove DS, Bruce C, Wang X, Levi T, Lott M, Emerson BC, Yu DW (2013) Reliable, verifiable and efficient monitoring of biodiversity via metabarcoding. Ecology Letters, 16 (10) : 1245 - 1257. doi: 10.1111/ele.12162

Kitching RL, Ashton LA, Nakamura A, Whitaker T, Khen CV (2013) Distance-driven species turnover in Bornean rainforests: homogeneity and heterogeneity in primary and post-logging forests. Ecography, 36 (6) : 675 - 682. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0587.2012.00023.x

Ashton L, R. L.KitchingAffiliatedwithEnvironmentalFuturesCentre,GriffithSchooloftheEnvironment,GriffithUniversityEmailauthor,L.A.Ashton,C.J.Burwell,S.L.Boulter,PenelopeGreenslade,M.J.Laidlaw,C.L.Lambkin,S.C.Maunsell,A.Nakamura,F.Ødegaard (2013) Sensitivity and Threat in High-Elevation Rainforests: Outcomes and Consequences of the IBISCA-Queensland Project, In: Treetops at Risk, Springer New York : 131 - 139.

Ashton L (2011) Detecting biodiversity changes along climatic gradients: the IBISCA-Queensland Project. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, 55 (2) : 235 - 250.

Ashton L (2011) Macrolepidopteran assemblages along an altitudinal gradient in subtropical rainforest–exploring indicators of climate change. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, 55 : 375 - 389.

Introduction

Summary

Louise Ashton is a postdoctoral fellow at the Natural History Museum, London. Her research focuses on tropical rainforest biodiversity, climate change impacts on insect communities and understanding the factors shaping community assembly across environmental gradients, primarily using insect herbivores. Recently, her work has focused on ecosystem manipulation experiments to isolate and identify of the drivers of ecological functioning. In the future, Louise aims to use ecosystem manipulation experiments to explore ecological problems, focusing on rainforest canopies and the impacts of human activities.

Qualifications

Degrees

PhD, Griffith University, Australia

Employment history

Academic

Postdoctoral researcher, Natural History Museum, London, Life sciences, UK, 2015 - ongoing

Highlighted publications

Ashton LA, Nakamura A, Basset Y, Burwell CJ, Cao M, et al. (2016) Vertical stratification of moths across elevation and latitude. Journal of Biogeography, 43 (1) : 59 - 69. doi: 10.1111/jbi.12616

Ashton LA, Odell EH, Burwell CJ, Maunsell SC, Nakamura A, et al. (2016) Altitudinal patterns of moth diversity in tropical and subtropical Australian rainforests. Austral Ecology, 41 (2) : 197 - 208. doi: 10.1111/aec.12309

Publications

Publications

Ashton LA, Barlow HS, Nakamura A, Kitching RL (2015) Diversity in tropical ecosystems: the species richness and turnover of moths in Malaysian rainforests. Insect Conservation and Diversity, 8 (2) : 132 - 142. doi: 10.1111/icad.12090

Ashton LA, Nakamura A, Basset Y, Burwell CJ, Cao M, Eastwood R, Odell E, De OliveiraEG, Hurley K, Katabuchi M, Maunsell S, Mcbroom J, Schmidl J, Sun Z, Tang Y, Whitaker T, Laidlaw MJ, Mcdonald WJF, Kitching RL (2016) Vertical stratification of moths across elevation and latitude. Journal of Biogeography, 43 (1) : 59 - 69. doi: 10.1111/jbi.12616

Ashton LA, Odell EH, Burwell CJ, Maunsell SC, Nakamura A, Mcdonald WJF, Kitching RL (2016) Altitudinal patterns of moth diversity in tropical and subtropical Australian rainforests. Austral Ecology, 41 (2) : 197 - 208. doi: 10.1111/aec.12309

Nakamura A, Burwell CJ, Ashton LA, Laidlaw MJ, Katabuchi M, Kitching RL (2016) Identifying indicator species of elevation: Comparing the utility of woody plants, ants and moths for long-term monitoring. Austral Ecology, 41 (2) : 179 - 188. doi: 10.1111/aec.12291

Odell EH, Ashton LA, Kitching RL (2016) Elevation and moths in a central eastern Queensland rainforest. Austral Ecology, 41 (2) : 133 - 144. doi: 10.1111/aec.12272

Ashton L (2013) Predictor sets and biodiversity assessment: the evolution and application of an idea.. Pacific Conservation Biology, 19 : 418 - 426.

Ji Y, Ashton L, Pedley SM, Edwards DP, Tang Y, Nakamura A, Kitching R, Dolman PM, Woodcock P, Edwards FA, Larsen TH, Hsu WW, Benedick S, Hamer KC, Wilcove DS, Bruce C, Wang X, Levi T, Lott M, Emerson BC, Yu DW (2013) Reliable, verifiable and efficient monitoring of biodiversity via metabarcoding. Ecology Letters, 16 (10) : 1245 - 1257. doi: 10.1111/ele.12162

Kitching RL, Ashton LA, Nakamura A, Whitaker T, Khen CV (2013) Distance-driven species turnover in Bornean rainforests: homogeneity and heterogeneity in primary and post-logging forests. Ecography, 36 (6) : 675 - 682. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0587.2012.00023.x

Ashton L, R. L.KitchingAffiliatedwithEnvironmentalFuturesCentre,GriffithSchooloftheEnvironment,GriffithUniversityEmailauthor,L.A.Ashton,C.J.Burwell,S.L.Boulter,PenelopeGreenslade,M.J.Laidlaw,C.L.Lambkin,S.C.Maunsell,A.Nakamura,F.Ødegaard (2013) Sensitivity and Threat in High-Elevation Rainforests: Outcomes and Consequences of the IBISCA-Queensland Project, In: Treetops at Risk, Springer New York : 131 - 139.

Ashton L (2011) Detecting biodiversity changes along climatic gradients: the IBISCA-Queensland Project. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, 55 (2) : 235 - 250.

Ashton L (2011) Macrolepidopteran assemblages along an altitudinal gradient in subtropical rainforest–exploring indicators of climate change. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, 55 : 375 - 389.