Skip navigation
2576 Views 17 Replies Last post: May 20, 2013 6:58 AM by MikeHardman RSS
Currently Being Moderated

Dec 11, 2012 5:27 AM

having trouble loading photo sorry

Large ammonite and ucrytallized eye ??

Attachments:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 11, 2012 11:37 AM (in response to gcain)
    Re: having trouble loading photo sorry

    Hi there,

    That's definitely a piece of ammonite, but not an eye I'm afraid.

    • Report Abuse
      • Currently Being Moderated
        Jan 8, 2013 2:29 PM (in response to gcain)
        Re: having trouble loading photo sorry

        Hi

         

        Looks like a bivalve shell, what makes you think it could be an eye its very rare for soft tissues to become fossilised

         

        Steve

        • Report Abuse
      • Currently Being Moderated
        Jan 8, 2013 5:52 PM (in response to gcain)
        Re: having trouble loading photo sorry

        Hi there,

        It looks like a piece of flint. You can often find fossils in flint, such as the sea urchins that you find on the coast in the South-East of England. Pieces of flint are often mistaken for fossils because of their strange shapes and the patterns they sometimes contain, but this is not a fossil eye, I'm afraid. As the other poster mentioned, fossils of soft body parts are very seldom preserved, and on the rare occasions when they are, it is in fine-grained sedimentary rocks such as limestones. Even in these circumstances, preservation at the level of detail that you are suggesting is unheard of. Furthermore, flint forms in soft deposits on the sea floor, so it can only preserve the animals that lived in that environment, such as sea urchins, and these animals did not have large, complex eyes.

        Good luck with future fossil hunting!

        • Report Abuse
      • Currently Being Moderated
        Apr 20, 2013 6:00 AM (in response to gcain)
        Re: having trouble loading photo sorry

        I'm late to this thread, but if I may comment:

         

        - Modern eye specialists should recognize what may be an eye - in the sense of Einstien's 'No amount of experimentation can ever prove me right; a single experiment can prove me wrong'. They are most likely to be wrong when working in a field remote from their sphere of experience, such as the geological past.

         

        - The general structure of bivavle shells has some similarities with that of a compound eye, especially:

          - overall roundness in 'plan' view

           - curved in cross section

           - a prismatic layer, with the prisms arranged normal to the (curved) surface

            (fig.3 at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0012160605000461#gr3),

            superficially resembling the prisms in a compound eye.

         

        - An alternative quite likely in the Lyme Regis area is an ammonite aptychus, which can look superficially like a bivalve shell;  see - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aptychus.

        • Report Abuse

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked by (0)