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4679 Views 28 Replies Last post: Nov 6, 2015 10:54 AM by Biba RSS
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Nov 2, 2015 4:20 PM

Are these dinosaur fossils?

Hello Fossils and Rocks Forum.

 

Like others we headed to Dorset for the half term and found these fossils at Hive Beach in Dorset (it was popular there!)

 

Can you let us know what they are or might be?

 

They are fossils, but we have only ever found Crinoids before, on Lindisfarne in Northumberland, so we are a bit out of our depth!  Any help gratefully received - thanks...

 

photo[1].JPG

 

photo[2].JPG

 

photo.JPG

 

photo[3].JPG

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    Nov 2, 2015 5:42 PM (in response to Biba)
    Re: Are these dinosaur fossils?

    Hello Biba

    if you are referrng to the Burton Bradstock cliffs then you will finding Middle Jurassic fossils in the "Inferior Oolite" Formation, fallen from the cliff top.  It is a very dangerous place to go (fatality 2012) so please be careful if you go again.

    Capture.JPG

    I am not sure about your first three images - please can you scrub the specimen as much as possible and re-photograph when wet (without flash) - thanks for using a scale, that is essential.  It MIGHT be vertebrate bone.

     

    The last image has a very nice Rhynchonellid Brachiopod bottom left.  The circle on the right might be a crinoid stem but they are usually star-shaped in the Jurassic - can you send a photo of the other side please? 

     

    You should look at this website, especially the rock fall photos.....

    http://www.southampton.ac.uk/~imw/burton.htm

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        Nov 2, 2015 6:28 PM (in response to Biba)
        Re: Are these dinosaur fossils?

        Hi Biba

        Interesting finds!

        Your first find the bone, is it stone like? or lighter? Because on one side it looks quite natural but the other looks to have been cut with a saw, may look different with a wash.

        More interesting finds in your last image, well done, can't wait to see more images of the bone.

         

        Tabfish

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    Nov 3, 2015 11:58 AM (in response to Biba)
    Re: Are these dinosaur fossils?

    Thanks for doing that - it certainly looks like 175 million years old bone, possibly tail vertebra of an Ichthyosaur or Plesiosaur but a bit long for a vertebra so maybe a paddle bone or other limb

    - I will ask an expert friend and maybe Fiona can ask in the NHM. 

     

    Google those words + Images

     

    PS: Dinosaurs were land animals whereas Ichthyosaurs and Plesiosaurs were marine reptiles (not Dinosaurs).

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        Nov 3, 2015 2:57 PM (in response to Biba)
        Re: Are these dinosaur fossils?

        That's an exceptional find Biba, very well done, you can even see a couple of thin lairs of iron pyrite on the surface of the bone.

        Possibly a paddle bone partially worn buy the sea.

         

        Tabfish

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    Nov 3, 2015 5:48 PM (in response to Biba)
    Re: Are these dinosaur fossils?

    The resident palaeontologist (ex-BNH) at Charmouth Heritage Coast Centre (CHCC) has advised as follows (more legible if you open in new tab - rt clk):-

    Capture.JPG

    We would be grateful if you would email CHCC - contact info on the website www.charmouth.org/CHCC

     

    Many thanks

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        Nov 3, 2015 8:36 PM (in response to Biba)
        Re: Are these dinosaur fossils?

        I can think of five options for the circular fossil, Crinoid Ossicle, Part of a Sea Urchin, Fish vert, the blunt end of a Belemnite or the base of a bullet case.

        Don't really know which one to go for ?

        Interesting, cann't wait for mor images Biba.

         

        Tabfish

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    Nov 4, 2015 9:16 AM (in response to Biba)
    Re: Are these dinosaur fossils?

    Will ask around...

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    Nov 4, 2015 11:34 AM (in response to Biba)
    Re: Are these dinosaur fossils?

    Hi Biba,

     

    This is tricky to see from the photograph.The rings of this fossil look very similar to those in fish/shark vertebrae. Althought crinoids can have bulbous nodes and a crenularium, they don't usually have that many rings.

    1. I think the first thing is to establish if it is bone or calcite?
    2. Please can you tell me if the 'hole' in the middle of the circular fossil is real or whether sediment infill?

     

    Best wishes

    Fiona

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    Nov 4, 2015 11:55 AM (in response to Biba)
    Re: Are these dinosaur fossils?

    Could you also put a drop of weak acid (e.g. vinegar, lemon juice) on it so see if it fizzes - the rock might fizz so try to distinguish whether it's the rock or the fossil

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    Nov 4, 2015 7:05 PM (in response to Biba)
    Re: Are these dinosaur fossils?

    PS - what coin is that?  Since is further away than the fossil, please can you say the diameter of the fossil in mm please?

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    Nov 4, 2015 10:47 PM (in response to Biba)
    Re: Are these dinosaur fossils?

    The bone is a tail vertebra from a thalattosuchian. These are marine crocodylomorphs from the Jurassic and the Early Cretaceous periods. I am unaware of any fossils of this group from this location so I'd like to find out a bit more from you about where this was found. It could be worth a short paper in a scientific journal. I've already contacted a colleague who is an expert on these particular reptiles so I'll update you when he replies. This is a fairly big tail vertebra and I'd like to check if it's possible to be more precise about which family of thalattosuchian it's from. Certainly a really good find. The wrinkly looking surface is where the neural arch was joined on, and the spinal cord went through the gap. That surface fuses together when the animal gets older. In crocs this fusion begins at the tip of the tail and moves forwards, so this animal was not old when it died. This is a really exciting find so keep it safe!

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      Nov 5, 2015 9:38 AM (in response to Lorna Steel)
      Re: Are these dinosaur fossils?

      Message from Lorna, who is unwell and unable to post this herself:

       

      "the bone is without doubt a metriorhynchid or teleosaurid tail vertebra. That's a thalattosuchian crocodylomorph. It might be of scientific importance from this site, can you pass that on? That time period is something of a gap in the fossil record for these animals. They are in abundance in the Callovian through to the Tithonian, but not before."

       

      Very exciting! Well done!

      Fiona

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    Nov 4, 2015 11:06 PM (in response to Biba)
    Re: Are these dinosaur fossils?

    Brilliant - thanks Lorna

     

    Biba: go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thalattosuchia

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    Nov 6, 2015 9:27 AM (in response to Biba)
    Re: Are these dinosaur fossils?

    Hi Biba,

     

    The specimen looks much cleaner and we can see the concentric rings. The fact that the rock fizzes but your circular fossil does not suggests that it is bone, probably shark or fish vertebra.

     

     

    Best wishes

    Fiona

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    Nov 6, 2015 10:39 AM (in response to Biba)
    Re: Are these dinosaur fossils?
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