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3313 Views 5 Replies Last post: Aug 26, 2010 9:31 AM by Geastrum RSS
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Aug 21, 2010 10:15 PM

Horntail/woodwasp? (not Uroceras gigas)

Please can anyone ID these bugs found on ground in a patch of isolated broadleaved woodland in Norfolk. Saw at least 5 in a few square metres. They look a bit like woodwasps but not the Greater Horntail. They are about 20-25mm in length.

Thanks.

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    Aug 23, 2010 2:21 PM (in response to Geastrum)
    Re: Horntail/woodwasp? (not Uroceras gigas)
    That is a sawfly, Xiphydria.  It is probably Xiphydria camelus but there is a rare species, Xiphydria longicollis, which is similar.  I can't tell the difference but someone else here may be able to.
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        Aug 25, 2010 11:38 AM (in response to Geastrum)
        Re: Horntail/woodwasp? (not Uroceras gigas)

        I've alerted Guy Knight, at Liverpool Museum, who is the UK sawfly recording scheme organiser, to have a look at your post, as my sawfly knowledge is now exhausted.....

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        Aug 25, 2010 1:14 PM (in response to Geastrum)
        Re: Horntail/woodwasp? (not Uroceras gigas)

        It is indeed X. longicollis, and its an important record - only the 8th time it has been recorded in the UK.  Guy has requested that you get in touch with him as he's anxious to get full data.  Could you please make contact with him via email?  Guy.knight(at)liverpoolmuseums.org.uk.  I've pasted his comment below and attached the mentioned newsletter to this post:

         

        "Very good. Yes it is X. longicollis. Only the 8th British record - I had one earlier in the year from Surrey and the previous 6 are mentioned in the attached newsletter article.
        It is a very uncommon insect and one which often seems to be associated with nice ancient woodland. It is interesting that this one came from a small wood. There are Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire records but nothing from as far east as Norfolk. It is quite common for many Xiphydria to emerge from infested logs at about the same time although I'm not sure how they coordinate this!
        Thanks for alerting me to this. If possible I would like to include a note on this in the next newsletter and would also be grateful for the full locality data. Could you please put me in touch with the person who posted the pictures? They might also be interested in the attached newsletter."
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