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644 Views 2 Replies Last post: Aug 15, 2013 9:59 PM by MikeHardman RSS
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Aug 15, 2013 1:21 PM

An interesting and worrying fungus

I am dealing with a fungus found at the base of a beech tree which appears to be growing from the ground between roots.  A holly is adjacent.  Churc tree fungus-9.JPG

 

There are many of them from this larger one to small ones just developing.

 

What is it?

Is it poisonous -Children play near by.

Will it kill the tree which towers over a grade one listed building which we have just spent £450,000 to restore and it would be a pitty if fell on it.

 

Len

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    Aug 15, 2013 4:54 PM (in response to LensImages)
    Re: An interesting and worrying fungus

    chicken of the woods (Laetiphorus sulphureus), very tasty in this age
    I think the tree will go down soon..depends on how bad it is now.
    good luck
    M

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    Aug 15, 2013 9:59 PM (in response to LensImages)
    Re: An interesting and worrying fungus

    Good call dryopteris.

     

    Len,

    I suggest you get an arboriculturist to inspect the tree. Some pathogenic fungi can weaken a tree significantly with relatively little sign from the outside. A sign that internal decay may have begun is large limbs having broken off (though that can also occur with sudden water stress). And if the tree overhangs the house, that should be a concern - as well as the tree toppling in its entirety. Also note that, even if the tree were to fall away from the house, the heave of the root plate could still damage the house, depending on proximity.

     

    If the tree has to come down (a shame, I know; and beech are one of my favourite trees), a good tree surgeon (perhaps recommended by the arboriculturist) should be able to manage the process to minimize risk to the house and grounds.

    What to do with the felled timber?

    - I would hope you could sell it, though that would depend on the degree and type of the decay, and the local supply/demand for beech.

    - It is also good for making wildlife-friendly wood piles (see this advice from the RSPB - http://www.rspb.org.uk/advice/gardening/deadwood.aspx).

     

    Mike

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