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2539 Views 3 Replies Last post: Apr 18, 2012 1:50 PM by Jen RSS
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Mar 23, 2011 12:10 AM

What happened to this Ash tree?

Hi,

 

This tree seems to have been modified about 1.5m up the trunk. What happened?  It's got a plaque stating "fraxinus exelsior" so I assume that's correct and it's an Ash tree (at least originally).DSC01547.JPG

  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 23, 2011 6:01 PM (in response to Londoner)
    Re: What happened to this Ash tree?
    This may just be a burl which has carried on all the way up the tree?
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    Mar 24, 2011 9:39 PM (in response to Londoner)
    Re: What happened to this Ash tree?
    I have seen burls like this caused by iron bands and barbed wire fencing before. One way to check would be with a metal detector.
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    Apr 18, 2012 1:50 PM (in response to Londoner)
    Re: What happened to this Ash tree?

    Was the canopy weeping rather than the standard Ash canopy? If so this could be the result of a graft.

    The lowest section would be the root stock of Fraxinus excelsior and the section above the grafted material, Fraxinus excelsior 'Pendula' . This is commonly done with weeping varieties of trees such as Fraxinus, Prunus, Salix etc. The grafted material bulges out because of a different rate of growth in the two parts. Weeping Ash Fraxinus excelsior 'Pendula' was very popular in the Victorian era and as propagating from seed gives unpredictable results, vegetative propagation was, and is, commonly utilised to produce the plants.

    Jen

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