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4140 Views 6 Replies Last post: Aug 26, 2010 3:54 PM by DrFred - Museum ID team RSS
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Aug 22, 2010 11:21 PM

Identify Tree

Please could anyone help me identify this Tree ?
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    Aug 24, 2010 9:18 AM (in response to bellatoo)
    Re: Identify Tree

    Hi Bellatoo,

    Is it evergreen? It looks like one of the evergreen oaks to me. The most commonly grown evergreen oak in the UK is Quercus ilex ( Holm Oak).

    Shame its been cut down, a photo of the tree standing could have helped!

     

    Jon

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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 24, 2010 11:34 AM (in response to bellatoo)
    Re: Identify Tree

    Hi,

    I agree with Jon - this is Quercus ilex - the Holm Oak. The juvenile leaves are always much more spiny than the adult foliage  so when you get re-growth from a cut stump the leaves are like this.

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    Aug 24, 2010 4:59 PM (in response to bellatoo)
    Re: Identify Tree

    Dear bellatoo,

     

    Jon Ryan is spot on with his identification. This is an evergreen oak (we prefer the alternative name of holm oak, although holm just means evergreen). Its latin name Quercus ilex is also a clue, as Ilex is the name for holly and, as you can see, the leaves are very like those of holly.

     

    Holm oak leaves can be spiny or not and the spines are usually thin and rather weak compared to those of holly. However, in suckers they are much more robust. Your tree has produced numerous suckers as a result of being cut down.

     

    If you check the nearby tree you may be able to find acorns on it which will immediately confirmed the identification.

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      • Currently Being Moderated
        Aug 26, 2010 3:54 PM (in response to bellatoo)
        Re: Identify Tree

        Hi Bellatoo,

        Yes - your other tree is, as you guessed a Holm Oak too. The leaves are somewhat intermediate between the very spiny broader form shown by the juvenile re-growth and the most typical entire margin that is shown by most mature trees.

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