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768 Views 9 Replies Last post: Aug 5, 2014 9:22 AM by Sergii RSS
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Aug 4, 2014 12:12 PM

please help, I need to identify a tree by leaf

Dear colleagues,

 

I am writing paper about X-ray detectors, where I used a tree leaf for an oject for imaging. leaf.jpg

Couldnt you pleaese help me to identify the tree name?

 

Thank you,

 

with best regards,

Sergii

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    Aug 4, 2014 3:34 PM (in response to Sergii)
    Re: please help, I need to identify a tree by leaf

    Sergii,

     

    That looks like a Begonia (not a tree); there are many species and more cultivars.

    Are you sure the leaf came from a tree? If so, please describe the tree: size, evergreen/deciduous, flowers, fruit...

     

    Mike

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        Aug 4, 2014 4:13 PM (in response to Sergii)
        Re: please help, I need to identify a tree by leaf

        Sergii,

         

        I'm pleased to have been able to help you.

         

        Yes, please acknowledge my help; thank you for asking.

        Note that I do not work for the Natural History Museum. I am just a geologist and botanist (amongst other things) who helps answer questions on the NaturePlus forum. I live in Cyprus.

         

        Mike

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            Aug 4, 2014 9:32 PM (in response to Sergii)
            Re: please help, I need to identify a tree by leaf

            Sergii,

             

            I'm glad you like Cyprus.

             

            Biology has so much to reach us, for instance regarding materials. I have done some amateur research into mimetics. It is amazing how many of our technical problems have already been solved by Nature. We just need to know how to look, how to find those solutions (and then how to tune them to our particular needs). Good luck in your work.

             

            Mike

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                Aug 4, 2014 11:24 PM (in response to Sergii)
                Re: please help, I need to identify a tree by leaf

                Hi

                 

                For nature the wheel would have been impossible  how can you connect to the rim from a rotating axle to sense and  replenish or push and pull with out a crank shaft  having said that it cracked the sphere

                 

                Steve

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                  Aug 5, 2014 7:38 AM (in response to Steve Jelf)
                  Re: please help, I need to identify a tree by leaf

                  The wheel as part of a locomotive system - yes - tricky.

                   

                  But rotary motion itself...

                  ...Nature ticked that box.

                  ...And the propeller, at the same time!

                  The flagella of certain bacteria are helical propellers with a rotary engine (called the Mot complex). It can run at up to 17,000rpm and go into reverse almost instantaneously (the micro size obviously helps there, considering inertia, momentum, etc.)

                   

                  Oh - and you know how some locomotives have an engine at each end of the train?

                  Amphitrichous bacteria have a single flagellum on each of two opposite ends. They have a different purpose, however, to the train scenario: only one flagellum operates at a time, allowing the bacteria to reverse course rapidly by switching which flagellum is active.

                   

                  Read all about it

                  - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flagellum (the part headed 'Bacterial')

                   

                  Sperm cells have a similar mode of propulsion, although they can't go into reverse.

                  See http://worms.zoology.wisc.edu/dd2/echino/fert/sperm/sperm.html (including an animation, towards the end).

                   

                  Rotary propulsion presumes a motor. In this case, the motor is accomplished by the protein dynein, built into a structure called an axoneme. This is the sort of stuff nanotechnologists love, eg.

                  "Axonemal dynein -- a natural molecular motor" by Taylor and Holwill

                   

                   

                  Of course, mimetics does not come up in general conversation very much (unless you're talking with me, perhaps!) But there is a huge amount of research happening there nonetheless. And if you go looking for it, it can be fascinating.

                  Mirrors, various uses of polarized light, radar/sonar (bats and porpoises, eg.), adaptive insulaton, rangefinding (stereo vision), fishing nets, glue, composite beams, ballistics (various plants' seed dispersal mechanisms), osmotic water purification, visors, infra-red sensing (snakes), ultra-violet imaging (some insects), leverage systems, electrical messaging, camouflage (many animals) ...

                  One thing I love about all this is how it can be fascinating to both the ordinary person and the uber-tech nerd.

                   

                  Don't get me started.

                  ...Oh - too late!

                   

                  Mike

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