Skip navigation
153 Views 1 Reply Last post: Aug 1, 2014 9:54 PM by MikeHardman RSS
Currently Being Moderated

Aug 1, 2014 7:00 PM

Can you identify this tree?

Hi,

 

I wonder if anyone can help identify a tree in my Surrey garden please?

 

  • It's a deciduous tree about 5 metres high
  • In the spring it has white flowers
  • Right now it's covered in small green berries which will ripen to a nice shade of red in a couple of months
  • The leaves come off the branches in small clumps rather than individually

 

Sorry if this isn't much information to go on! Let me know if there's any more detail I can provide.

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Paul

Attachments:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 1, 2014 9:54 PM (in response to pauldwilson)
    Re: Can you identify this tree?

    Paul,

     

    The fruit are wrong for Amelanchier, so I think it is a cherry or an apple (crab apple or similar species).

     

    If it is a cherry, it is not of the wild sort (Prunus avium) - the leaves and bark are wrong.

    I'm not sure what species/cultivar it is.

    I would also be happier in that ID if I could see some petiolar glands. Those are tiny lumps, two per leaf, on the leaf stalk (petiole). Here's an example where they are fairly obvious - http://abugblog.blogspot.com/2011/06/nectar-from-cherry-leaves.html

    In many cases, however, they are very obscure.

    They are characteristic of Prunus leaves (cherries, plums, gages).

    Having the leaves somewhat in tufts would be right for some cherries.

     

    Because I can't see any petiolar glands, because of the pattern of the veins and marginal toothing of the leaves, and the nature of the bark, I lean towards apple. There are lots of crab apples or similar-looking species, differing in size of tree, size and colour of fruit, and other things. It would be difficult to ID the species/cultivar.

     

    The key thing to do is cut open a fruit: if it has one kernel, it is a cherry; if it has multiple pips it is a crab apple. Please let us know!

     

    Whichever it is, the fruit is probably edible (test that only at your own risk). I say that because it appears the tree was grafted (at the top of the stright trunk), and that's most likely to be done on a domestic fruit tree.

     

    Mike

    • Report Abuse

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked by (0)