Skip navigation
305 Views 3 Replies Last post: Jul 30, 2014 2:56 PM by MikeHardman RSS
Currently Being Moderated

Jul 28, 2014 6:00 PM

Fossil or rock ?

Hi there

 

It's been a while I am trying to ID this rock. First, I thought it was an instantly cristallized tentacle or something like this, because the circles are in perfect rows. 4 rows of double circles are visible, and then, it's like it continues, but it's squeezed. Many forums said it's impossible that a tentacle got fossilized this well... If it's not a fossil, maybe a strange rock, agate, jasper ? It was found on a beach at Perce, Gaspesie, Qc, Canada. Please help me with this !!!

 

In the picture with 3 objects, is the first one a fossilized Tabulate Coral ? (also found at the same place)

 

Thank you,

 

Lukasz

Attachments:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 28, 2014 10:26 PM (in response to Obiezyswiat)
    Re: Fossil or rock ?

    Lukasz,

     

    I think the orangey one might be an encrusting alga. Here's an example (I'm not saying this is your one) - http://intertidal-novascotia.blogspot.com/2012/05/clathromorphum-spp-coralline-crust.html

    It looks like it has been worn and polished somewhat by wave action.

     

    I'm not sure about the other two.

     

    Mike

    • Report Abuse
      • Currently Being Moderated
        Jul 30, 2014 2:56 PM (in response to Obiezyswiat)
        Re: Fossil or rock ?

        Lukasz,

         

        I am sure it is not fossil; it is modern, a few years old. But it is encrusting a pebble of rock that it probably millions of years old. Modern encrusting algae are hard and come in a range of colours (pink more common than red).

         

        The pattern of ovals and lines: I am sure these are the result of growth layers being eroded. Encrusting algae often have protuberances; if they get worn down, they will become oval shapes. And if they are comprised of layers, the ovals will contain smaller ovals. The lines also represent layers, and may have formed at the edge of the encrustation, perhaps where the pebble met the sand in which it was half-buried.

         

        More on coralline algae

        - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coralline_algae

         

        List of coralline algae species in the British Isles

        - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_coralline_algae_species_in_the_British_Isles

         

         

        Please note: coralline algae is still just a suggestion.

        We could really do with an aquatic zoologist...

         

         

        Mike

        • Report Abuse

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked by (0)