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425 Views 7 Replies Last post: Jul 14, 2014 6:50 PM by MikeHardman RSS
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Jul 14, 2014 2:12 PM

tree identification

This tree is in south new jersey usa.  It looks like a large bush but its actually a tree the has grown over.   If you look underneath there is actually a trunk.    Please help me id it

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    Jul 14, 2014 2:59 PM (in response to Dawgs)
    Re: tree identification

    Please could you also post a link to where-ever it is that you already have it under discussion; I'd like to see the (7) comments.

     

    Please can you give more info:

    - close-up on leaves

    - any sign/knowledge of flower or fruit? (perhaps ask neighbours)

    - any unusual characteristics? (scent of buds, latex sap...)

    - any other specimens of it in the area?, hopefully not pruned into a rounded shape - so the more natural form of the species is revealed

    - are the leaves arranged alternately along the stem, or oppositely, and if the latter, in twos or threes?

     

    The reason I ask the last question is because, if I were to have a stab right now, I'd suggest Catalpa speciosa, which has its leaves in whorls of three (though that is not actually unique in itself).

    (http://www.ndsu.edu/pubweb/chiwonlee/plsc211/student%20papers/articles05/hanson,%20derek/Lab%20Report%204/dhanson.htm)

     

    Mike

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          Jul 14, 2014 6:05 PM (in response to Dawgs)
          Re: tree identification

          Ah - it is probably a cultivar grafted on top of a trunk of the normal species (of whatever it is).

          That may also account for it not apparently flowering.

           

          I presume your folks didn't plant it. Are they in touch with the previous owners, who may have done so?...

           

          Mike

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      Jul 14, 2014 6:50 PM (in response to Dawgs)
      Re: tree identification

      Ah - those photos help a lot; I can see some leaves in whorls of three. Because of that, and various other little things, I am sure it is Catalpa. You could perhaps get your folks to check that by crushing a leaf and seeing if it gives a strange odour.

       

      In the US, the two most likely species are C. speciosa (northern catalpa) and C. bignonioides (southern catalpa).

      They are differentiated mainly by flowers and seedpods - which we don't have. You can do some more research yourself now that I've given you those two names to go at.

      But I do note that there is a dwarf form of C. bignonioides, C. b. 'Nana', which might be what you have

      - http://www.floridata.com/ref/c/catalpa.cfm. Like I said, it might be grafted.

      That's the best I can do.

       

      If you are note sure what I was on about in mentioning 'whorls of three', the right-most photo here shows it:

      - http://www.aucoeurdelarbre.ca/en/from-root-to-crown/foliage/slide-show.php?id=6&media_id=4

       

      Mike

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