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1968 Views 8 Replies Last post: Mar 19, 2014 7:20 PM by Dan RSS
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Mar 12, 2014 12:18 PM

fossils/bones? found in somerset

hi, i would like to find out what these are? i think they are bone, but very old because they have ammonite on them. also i found them verry deep in the ground. any hellp will be appreciated.

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    Mar 12, 2014 3:26 PM (in response to Ady)
    Re: fossils/bones? found in somerset

    Well, if they represent bones (and I can see where you're coming from, with the shape), they would have to be casts. And I suppose it is possible for the cast material to be sediment that happens to include fossil fragments.

    Something doesn't seem right, though...

     

    Any other ideas, anybody?...

     

    Mike

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    Mar 12, 2014 10:42 PM (in response to Ady)
    Re: fossils/bones? found in somerset

    They certainly look like bones,  are you sure its an ammonite? could it be an encrusting organism, a bryzoan, foram or surplid worm that looks like an ammonite? Some of the pictures look like there may be encrusters on other bits. I'm afraid thats all I can suggest, have you got any more info on the location? might help to get a better stratigraphic perspective, I found some weird similar shaped things in the middle lias some years ago my finds tuned out to be infilled burrows and and a belemnite ballast tank, I don't think thats what you have though.

    I'll keep thinking!

     

    Alex

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        Mar 15, 2014 11:33 AM (in response to Ady)
        Re: fossils/bones? found in somerset

        Nice finds.  The first ones and the second one is almost Curtainly plesiosaur flipper bones.  It looks like you have  found a partial plesiosaur skeleton.  If you look at the same spot you may find some more bones.  In pic4 I'm fairly confident there is a plesiosaur tooth in the matrix, which could suggest the same matrix has more teeth and maybe part of the jaw/skull. I'm fairly confident all the bones are flipper bones, probably off the same flipper.  I would think it would be off a fully grown plesiosaur.

         

         

         

        To get a more curtain ID you could send some pictures off  to the Angela Marmont Centre.

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        Mar 15, 2014 2:04 PM (in response to Ady)
        Re: fossils/bones? found in somerset

        If you google plesiosaur paddle bones you can see which part of the paddle each bone came from.

         

         

        But here's where I think they came from:

         

        1/2: near the centre of the paddle

         

        3: Humorous Bone

         

        4: I think it's a plesiosaur tooth so it isn't a paddle bone but I wouldn't be surprised if the same matrix has part of the jaw/skull and possibly neck vertebrae.  You could use an air brush to remove the rock but they are very dangerous due to the bits of rock which come of them and the dust which comes off them which you can't see (which is why goggles and masks should be used at all times.

         

         

        Going by the location, I would say they are upper jurassic- 160 million years old, but since they were very deep in the ground it's hard to tell (but they are definetly upper jurassic, it's just hard to tell the exact age.)

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            Mar 19, 2014 7:20 PM (in response to Ady)
            Re: fossils/bones? found in somerset

            Hi.  I'm quite sure they're bones, but it's hard to be fully sure because, as mike said they are the casts of the bone, so the bone marrow won't be there, but I'm quite sure they are bone by the shape.  They will be quite rare, especially from the Somerset area (if they are plesiosaur bones).  I'm not sure how much they would be worth, but since they are the cast of the bone, and not the actual bone, it could make them slightly less rare.  However, I would think they could be worth quite a bit, but I very much doubt they would be worth more than 200 pounds, although I would say about 60 pounds is about the value.  You could varnish the bones by using wood varnish, which I always use because it brings out the best details in the fossils, but I have never polished a fossil bone before (I usually varnish plant fossils which I find.)

             

             

             

            I doubt a museum would want them for a main display for the public to see, but they have rooms for fossils which aren't good enough for display that are used for study.  I have attached a picture of a cast of a carboniferous tree branch, which I found in West Yorkshire.  You can tell it's a cast be cause it's hollow in the middle.

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