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1459 Views 12 Replies Last post: Dec 2, 2013 5:50 PM by Dan RSS
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Nov 30, 2013 3:22 PM

Fossil seed?

Hi,

 

I found this today in Ossett, West Yorkshire, UK and if it's a fossil it's carboniferous in age.

 

 

 

Is it a fossil seed?

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    Nov 30, 2013 3:46 PM (in response to Dan)
    Re: Fossil seed?

    Dan,

     

    It does look a bit that way, I agree.

    I suggest seeing if you can carefully exrtact it from the sandstone - so we can see the shape and perhaps some surface texture. Work on the sandstone - avoid the temptation to prise the 'seed' out!

     

    Mike

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        Nov 30, 2013 10:53 PM (in response to Dan)
        Re: Fossil seed?

        Hi Dan

        I hope this helps you in your fossil preperation.

        An air brush? do you meen air abrasive (abrasive particals in an air stream) this would only clean the surface of the fossil and remove preperation marks.

        I have seen people use masonary nails to prep fossils with good results but what I love to use and cannot be beaten if you are on a limited budget is a DART!

        I use them all of the time because they are cheep, last a long time and you cannot get anythng better for the job at that price.

        I have air pens but most of the time I will start with a dart to remove 'rough out' the matrix of Arnioceras sp multi blocks, when i get near the ammonite fossil i just use a smaller (thinner) dart.

        Don't forget your eyes are very important! wear safety glasses! I do and every day in my shed they save my sight because you can hear the rock hitting the lenses and bouncing off.

        Please see images of different darts below.

         

        Tabfish

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            Dec 1, 2013 9:05 PM (in response to Dan)
            Re: Fossil seed?

            Hi Dan

            They last for a very long time! i keep them sharp by using a wet stone usually used for sharpening wood chissels.

            Remove the flight and plastic shaft then put a piece of metal inside to use as a shaft to hold onto and to hit, i use a small hammer but the darts I have used have taken blows from a lot bigger hammer.

            I also have a dart with a dome topped screw were the darts shaft fitts so that i can hand prep soft rocks (the end of the dart with the dome topped screw fitts into the palm of your hand)

            If you want an image let me know.

            Safety first.

             

            Tabfish

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        Dec 1, 2013 3:46 PM (in response to Dan)
        Re: Fossil seed?

        Dan,

         

        Oo - that's interesting - it looks like there are three in a row (and somewhat en echelon); obviously could have been more originally, but just the three in your specimen.

        Would definitely need to know if those bits are connected in 3D, or if separate, if they are broadly the same as each other.

         

        Mike

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            Dec 1, 2013 9:53 PM (in response to Dan)
            Re: Fossil seed?

            We can't rule out pebbles yet, though they seem to be unusually ferruginous.

             

            The 'wood'. When dealing with multiple specimens, there's naturally the chance that, in reality, some are and some are not. But on top of that, we have to interpret what we find and see - to try to determine what that reality is. That means that with many specimen IDs we have to talk in terms of 'level of confidence', rather than being able to make a definite ID.

            With some specimens, especially where it is a mould rather than the item itself, there could be alternative explanations. In the case of wood, it could be confused with a patch of slickensiding, maybe; or a trace fossil of some sort. To help ease such ambiguity, we would sometimes 'lean on' local evidence - such as knowing fossil wood had been definitely IDd in the same strata nearby.

             

            Geology may be a science, but it contains plenty of grey areas.

             

            Mike

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