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2937 Views 18 Replies Last post: Oct 30, 2013 10:22 PM by Tabfish RSS
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Oct 24, 2013 9:45 PM

Holderness Shark tooth

This is the only shark/ray tooth that I have seen found (i did not find it) on the Holderness.

It came from Skipsea and was found as an erratic, probably coming from the Cretaceous chalk of Bempton or Flamborough and left behind by a receading glazier many thousands of years ago.

Can someone put a name to it please?

 

Tabfish

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    Oct 25, 2013 4:00 PM (in response to Tabfish)
    Re: Holderness Shark tooth

    I Would say it's from pychodus anonymus.  Quite a strange tooth.  I like fossil hunting on the Yorkshire Coast but the thing is you can only really find ammonites, bellemites, brachiopods, the odd fish fossils, and the occasional coral, and if you are extremely lucky, you can find ichthyosaur fossils and shark fossils.  I'm going to redcarr in the spring: do I stand a good chance of finding an ichthyosaur fossil because the fossils there are 200 million years old which is the perfect age for an ichthyosaur fossil?

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    Oct 25, 2013 5:41 PM (in response to Tabfish)
    Re: Holderness Shark tooth

    Hi,

    Looks most like Ptychodus latissimus to me.  A variety of this species (sometimes classified as a species in its own right), P. paucisulctaus, seems to fit. 

     

    ... Although on second thoughts this variety is not known from Yorkshire (according to the book 'Fossils of the Chalk'). So I'd just stick with P.latissimus.

     

    see:

    http://chalk.discoveringfossils.co.uk/5%20Ptychodus.htm

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        Oct 26, 2013 12:52 PM (in response to Tabfish)
        Re: Holderness Shark tooth

        Maybe the fossil bone on the bottom could actually be fossil cartilage from its jaw.

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            Oct 26, 2013 11:27 PM (in response to Tabfish)
            Re: Holderness Shark tooth

            It is the tooth's root.

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            Oct 27, 2013 9:25 AM (in response to Tabfish)
            Re: Holderness Shark tooth

            I don't think it is the root.  If you go on www.fossiliferous.co.uk and then go on sharks UK mozeoic, you will see fossil carterlage from the jaw which lookes simular.  Also, the bone looks too small to be the root to me. I'm not sure on the species, but I thinkit looks different to the species quagga suggested.

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                Oct 27, 2013 8:34 PM (in response to Tabfish)
                Re: Holderness Shark tooth

                When you say it had to be set in something do you mean it had to have been in a rock.  Maybe it didn't actually come from chalk but shale.  Usually the fossils from chalk are more white and fossils from shale can be a number of different colours.

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    Oct 27, 2013 9:02 PM (in response to Tabfish)
    Re: Holderness Shark tooth

    That is a great specimen! The "bone" is without doubt the root of the shark tooth, I have collected a number of these from the chalk and all look similar to that. I agree with the ID of Ptychodus latissimus.

     

    Regards,

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        Oct 29, 2013 10:29 PM (in response to Tabfish)
        Re: Holderness Shark tooth

        I am very interested in this specimen. Do you have any clear photos I could use for filed reference?

        Many thanks.

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            Oct 30, 2013 9:27 PM (in response to Tabfish)
            Re: Holderness Shark tooth

            Thank you Tabfish. The red chalk I have been to has not been all that productive, upper levels have produced greater numbers of specimens.

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                Oct 30, 2013 10:15 PM (in response to Tabfish)
                Re: Holderness Shark tooth

                Thats's brilliant, thank you for the extra images. I have not heard of a Ptychodus tooth found as an arratic before. They are scarce enough in the chalk and to have one survive like this is just incredible.

                 

                It is quite a large shark tooth so would have been near the centre of the tooth palate. For obvious reasons it is fairly worn but this has brought out the beautiful internal structure of the tooth.

                 

                Thanks again for the pictures. I will be more than happy to help with your sponges.

                 

                Regards,

                Thomas

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