Skip navigation
467 Views 7 Replies Last post: Oct 24, 2013 10:33 PM by Tabfish RSS
Currently Being Moderated

Oct 23, 2013 11:36 AM

Unidentified rocks from Welsh beach...

Hi all,

 

Please could someone possibly identify these following rocks that I collected off a Welsh beach recently? I would like to get them labelled up etc but I'm still developing my geology skills so I'm unsure of what they are!

 

Many thanks,

 

Ryan.

Attachments:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 23, 2013 2:36 PM (in response to RyanP)
    Re: Unidentified rocks from Welsh beach...

    Ryan,

     

    1. repeat of stone in your next posting

     

    2. from a vein system; there are sufficient veins that it is difficult to see what is the original rock; the veins look in part like quartz (translucent) and the beach erosion has not made them stand-out of become recessed, so the host rock is probably of similar composition - so the host rock may be quartzite, quartz-rich sandstone, flint, etc. Alternatively, I might be wrong about the veins being quartz; if they are calcite then the host rock is probably limestone.

     

    3. not sure, could even be biogenic (eg. sponge); most probably calcareous

     

    4. very difficult to tell, but could be something like jasper

     

    5. iron-rich fine-grained sandstone or quartzite

     

    6. can't tell if it is sedimentary or igneous, but I think the recesses/holes are modern, having been made by marine organisms that bore and/or dissolve the rock

     

    See my general comment in my reply to your other 'Unidentified rocks from Welsh beach' question.

     

    Mike

    • Report Abuse
      • Currently Being Moderated
        Oct 23, 2013 9:27 PM (in response to RyanP)
        Re: Unidentified rocks from Welsh beach...

        Hi Ryan

        First may I say great id from Mike and good finds Ryan.

        I pick up stones from the Holderness coast and sometimes I can change there appearence making them look different and revealing what they are made of.

        This specimen in the attached image took 10min under running water to prepare using 80 grit then 400 grit then 1000 grit wet and dry sand paper, when I found it you could only just tell what may be inside.

        Sometimes they go in the bin because they are no good but sometimes they turn out like this one, it is a coral.

         

        Tabfish

        Attachments:
        • Report Abuse
          • Currently Being Moderated
            Oct 24, 2013 8:46 PM (in response to RyanP)
            Re: Unidentified rocks from Welsh beach...

            Thank you Ryan, they are not hard to 'prep' you just have to find the right specimen!

            Below are a couple of images of a Lower Jurrasic Bivalve that one of my son's picked up on the Yorkshire coast.

            On the first image - one side i have left it 'as found' and the second image I have rubbed clear/neutral boot polish into it to make the detail stand out.

            This specimen was found self prepared and only needed a finishing touch.

             

            Tabfish

            Attachments:
            • Report Abuse

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked by (0)

What the symbols mean

  • "correct" answer available
  • "helpful" answer