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1112 Views 12 Replies Last post: Oct 31, 2013 10:51 PM by MikeHardman RSS
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Oct 22, 2013 3:32 PM

Help identifying this

Thanks everybody - you're expert knwoledge is gradually making me more familiar with the natural world and trees surrounding me. If anybody could help identify these below, that would be handy ...

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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 22, 2013 4:16 PM (in response to Currents)
    Re: Help identifying this

    All thre photos are the same...

    You must have made a mistake...

     

    Also:

    - where is this shrub?

    - does it have small greenish-white scented flowers?

     

    Mike

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      • Currently Being Moderated
        Oct 22, 2013 4:29 PM (in response to Currents)
        Re: Help identifying this

        Hang on - are you saying the original photo (Photo 4/5/6.jpg) is of the same plant?

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            Oct 22, 2013 4:43 PM (in response to Currents)
            Re: Help identifying this

            OK.

             

            I don't recognize it from the foliage and overall habit.

            (The twigs look too slender for the tree, somehow)

             

            Are there any old fruit (beries, seeds, nuts, pods, etc.) amongst the grass under the tree, remnants from last year? If so, it would help a great deal if you could photo/describe them.

             

            Where is it?

             

            Mike

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                Oct 22, 2013 11:11 PM (in response to Currents)
                Re: Help identifying this

                OK - London - so it must be quite hardy to have got to that size.

                 

                There are many trees that I have ruled out because the leaflets are toothed (Sorbus, Fraxinus, Carya, Pterocarya...)

                 

                Those leaves remind me so much of Cestrum nocturnum!

                But it can't be, because that never forms such a substantial and single-stemmed tree (it is also not hardy enough to survive long enough to do so).

                 

                See if walnut fits.

                One useful thing to look at is the scars where leaves have fallen off.

                This is what that looks like with walnuts

                http://www.nhm.ac.uk/resources-rx/images/1008/490-plain-walnut03-twig_67372_1.jpg

                You'll see from your photo that some of the leaflets are staggered along their stems (not exactly opposite). That does happen with walnuts, as shown in the picture here.

                 

                The tree is old enough to be fruiting, but the UK spring and summer may not have been conducive to fruit production this year. But you could still find walnut shells (whole or part) under the tree.

                 

                However, the leaves are not right in other ways for either of the common walnuts (Juglans regia, nigra).

                So this is still merely thinking out loud.

                 

                Mike

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                    Oct 23, 2013 1:13 PM (in response to Currents)
                    Re: Help identifying this

                    Please photos showing:

                    - a leaf in close-up, the whole thing from where it meets the twig

                    - the other side

                    - a twig, showing several leaves attached (that's so I can see buds, stipules, etc.)

                     

                    Mike

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      Oct 31, 2013 10:51 PM (in response to Currents)
      Re: Help identifying this

      Currants,

       

      Thanks for the further photos.

      They should help, but they don't, at least not to me.

      I thought I had it (Fraxinus ornus), but there are several aspects of the leaves that are not right (and it is not F. angustifolia, either).

       

      It also looks a bit like Trichilia glabra, but that is not hardy (from sub-Saharan Africa)

      http://chalk.richmond.edu/flora-kaxil-kiuic/t/trichilia_glabra.html

      (T. hirta is also similar.)

       

      All I can suggest is:

      - waiting and watching for flowers and fruit

      - referring to local knowledge: perhaps asking at Capel Manor Horticultural College (nearby)

        (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capel_Manor_College)

       

      If you make any progress, please post here again!

       

      If anybody else has suggestions, please post!

       

      Mike

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