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438 Views 2 Replies Last post: Sep 1, 2013 6:21 PM by heather RSS
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Sep 1, 2013 2:59 PM

Please can you identify this tree?

It appeared in my garden 2 years ago, and has grown to about 4 ft in that time - largest leaves nearly 4inches long. It hasn't flowered or fruited yet. It is about 6 feet from my kitchen wall, so I think I should move it further away, as it looks as if it could grow into a big tree. The soil is clay, bit acid I think, periodically flooded when it rains but dry in between.

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    Sep 1, 2013 4:29 PM (in response to heather)
    Re: Please can you identify this tree?

    Heather,

     

    I think it is a peach (Prunus persica) or necarine (Prunus persica var. nectarina).

    Look for pink flowers in spring in a year or two.

    Fruit may be produced, but one can't tell how good it will be (most peach/nectarine fruit come from named cultivars propagated vegetatively to maintain their selected qualities). Worth keeping fingers crossed, though!

     

    It could grow to a fair size, but should be manageable.

    However, do note that, like most Prunus, peach/nectarine is susceptible to silver leaf (fungal disease). For that reason, pruning should be done: while branches are small (a few inches diameter); in July-ish. If pruned in winter, as one would with mnay trees, silverleaf is more likely to enter. Summer pruning gives the tree a better chance at healing the (small) pruning cuts quicker.

     

    http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/407794/nectarine

    Note especailly: "This trial has been in progress long enough to indicate, at least for

    the Auckland district, that if young actively growing peach or nectarine

    trees are pruned shortly after harvest, they are unlikely to become infected with silver-leaf disease. Furthermore, no wound dressing appears

    to be necessary if normal pruning is carried out during this period. In

    South Africa, Heyns (1965) also reports that silver-leaf infection takes

    place readily during winter and not at all or with difficulty during summer"

     

    If it does turn out to be a peach/nectarine, please post here to let us know.

    If not, still post here and we'll have another go. By then, you should have some flowers and seeds/fruit to show us, too.

     

    http://www.rhs.org.uk/Gardening/Grow-Your-Own/Fruit-A-to-Z/Peaches---nectarines

     

    Mike

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