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705 Views 2 Replies Last post: Feb 6, 2013 9:33 AM by MikeHardman RSS
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Feb 4, 2013 9:51 PM

have I found flint tools?

Found these lot near Brandon, south of Grime's Graves on the Norfolk / Suffolk border. I *think* they show signs of working based on what I've been reading, but I'm not sure. Can you help?

 

I forgot to add a ruler into the picture, but the larger piece on the right is 55mm long whereas the 3 pieces to the left are about 30mm.

 

 

IMG_1370.JPG

IMG_1371.JPG

Thanks!

  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 6, 2013 7:19 AM (in response to sherpa)
    Re: have I found flint tools?

    They could be but if you found them near the coast the sea could have somth them down so they look like flint tools.

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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 6, 2013 9:33 AM (in response to sherpa)
    Re: have I found flint tools?

    Sherpa,

     

    Nice pieces.

     

    To generalize for a moment:

     

    1. Conchoical fracture surfaces occur when flint (or other amorphous material) is broken naturally or by hand. But thin pieces (like yours) are most likely to be be man-made.

     

    2. Flints are worked (knapped) to make tools (archeological) and dressed to make building stone in some parts of the country (historical).

     

    3. There is a lot of information on archeological flint tools; too much for me to comment on here in general.

    However, flint knapping is a skill, and because of the learning process and mistakes, some pieces that were intended to be tools were discarded; they can be very similar to finished tools, though not as refined.

     

    4. Sometimes, when flints have been dressed into building stone, the small waste pieces are inserted into the pointing (mortar) for decoration or strength; that is called galletting.

    - http://www.flickr.com/photos/richards_stream/3525281670/

    - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galleting

    - http://www.buildingconservation.com/articles/flint/flint.htm

     

     

    Your specimens:

     

    1. I suspect yours are waste material from flint workings. They could have been intended as tools but were deemed not good enough.

     

    2. Grime's Graves is known for its Neolithic flint mining, as you will be aware -

    http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/daysout/properties/grimes-graves-prehistoric-flint-mine/

    That supports my opinion.

     

    3. Somebody with greater expertise, especially of the Brandon area, please contribute!

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