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1718 Views 13 Replies Last post: Dec 9, 2013 9:46 PM by MikeHardman RSS
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Nov 27, 2012 2:58 PM

Moth I.D.

I found this Moth on a Rowan tree some time ago but have been unable to Identify It. Any Ideas?

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    Jan 17, 2013 2:56 PM (in response to John)
    Re: Moth I.D.

    Hi John,

     

    I am not having much luck identifying the moth either. Please can you tell me what time of year you saw it and if possible an approximate size.

     

    Thanks

     

    Chesca

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    Jan 17, 2013 9:05 PM (in response to John)
    Re: Moth I.D.

    I'm struggling, too.

    Tempted to suggest Luperina testacea, but even allowing for the considerable variation (good range here - http://www.lepiforum.de/cgi-bin/lepiwiki.pl?Luperina_Testacea) this moth in question seems too plainly coloured.

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      Jan 18, 2013 9:18 PM (in response to MikeHardman)
      Re: Moth I.D.

      Some other possibilities:

      - Aporophyla lutulenta (deep brown dart) - but the flight period is wrong (Aug-Oct)

      - Euxoa tritici (white-line dart) - right flight period, but the markings are not quite right (but they are variable)

      - Euxoa nigricans (garden dart) - flight period just about OK - worth finding more photos to compare

      - Polia bombycina (pale shining brown) - flight period OK- ditto

      But in none of those are the patterns quite right.

      When making comparisons, you need to look at many specimens from each species, because many species are quite variable.

       

      John: You probably know where you found the moth; that might help limit the possibilities. You could ask your local wildlife trust, but first see if there is a local moths group online. For isntance, here's a distribution map for garden dart in Northamptonshire - http://www.northamptonshirewildlife.co.uk/nmoths/2082.htm.

       

      Nat.Hist.Museum forum staff: I'm just giving pointers here, not answers; by all means reject my suggestions if you find the answer.

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    Nov 12, 2013 5:38 PM (in response to John)
    Re: Moth I.D.

    Have only just come across this one - in my moth trap I would call this Oligia strigilis agg. AKA Marbled Minor. It's an amazingly variable moth and the species of this genus overlap so much in appearance that genitalia dissection is the only reliable method of ID

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    Dec 9, 2013 5:15 PM (in response to John)
    Re: Moth I.D.

    I know there is alot of suggestions on the moth in these pictures but is the little critter beside it a mite or a baby spider?

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      Dec 9, 2013 8:43 PM (in response to SaraSimms)
      Re: Moth I.D.

      Sara,

      I'm not sure what you'r referring to.

      I see the folds and knobbliness of the bark (an apple tree, by the looks), and the moths' brown eye...

      Mike

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          Dec 9, 2013 9:46 PM (in response to John)
          Re: Moth I.D.

          Ah - yes - I was looking just at the first photo.

          Yes - a mite.

          Some red mites are quite large (all things relative), and I have seen one tucking in to a small dead moth (but I can't say if the mite actually killed it).

          Mike

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