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1753 Views 6 Replies Last post: Dec 20, 2012 12:17 PM by jaguarondi RSS
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Nov 24, 2012 9:02 PM

Spiders Escaping Floods

I took these photos near Muchelney, Someset on Friday 23rd November. I drove past about a 1/2mile of spiders escaping the recent floods. I just thought I would share these images for people interested in spiders.

 

This was a great natural event to see.

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    Dec 18, 2012 11:55 AM (in response to Bratby)
    Re: Spiders Escaping Floods

    Hi, this is Cate from BBC Winterwatch.  We are looking for pictures of animals affected by flooding.  Would you be happy for us to use it on one of our programmes please?  Thanks

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          Dec 20, 2012 8:48 AM (in response to Bratby)
          Re: Spiders Escaping Floods

          Hello,

          Thanks for posting the photos. I don't think these are just any spiders. Most spiders are not gregarious, and even when they escape floods would rather scatter in the vegetation on those islands, not become suddenly colonial and building communal webs. What you photographed may be the brood of one female, with the spiderlings still together before dispersal. But these could also be - and this could be more interesting - a type of spider that is colonial. Ostearius melanopygius, in the same family as the common garden spiders (Araneae) has this habit of living together with other spiders and building large webs. Here is a page about the species in Britain, and here is another page with some photos.

          I hope this helps.

          Best wishes,

          Florin

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            Dec 20, 2012 12:17 PM (in response to Florin - Museum ID team)
            Re: Spiders Escaping Floods

            From the nov 2 photo I'd guess that they're linyphiids (money spiders), which makes sense if they were spiders driven out of the lower vegetation of a grass verge, riverbank or whatever, as linyphiid spiders would be the most common. I think I can see the clubbed palps on some, indicating that they're adult males. I can see no evidence that they're Ostearius, though it's hard to tell.

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