Skip navigation
1627 Views 5 Replies Last post: Sep 3, 2011 3:04 PM by Drosophila RSS
Currently Being Moderated

Sep 1, 2011 12:36 PM

Translucent caterpillar - what is it?

Please can someone identify this insect that I found in the earth?
Attachments:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 2, 2011 9:11 PM (in response to Edith)
    Re: Translucent caterpillar - what is it?

    Nice pictures!  It has to be a beetle larva, (caterpillars have "false legs" at the end of their abdomen, beetle larvae don't), but no idea what kind.  Where did you find it?  I'm sure one of the experts can help.

    • Report Abuse
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 3, 2011 9:05 AM (in response to Edith)
    Re: Translucent caterpillar - what is it?
    This a chafer beetle larvae and the suspects for me would be either the Summer Chafer, Amphimallon solstitialis, or the Garden Chafer, Phyllopertha horticola. They are more commonly known as a lawn pest where they feed on the roots of grasses but will occasionally be found in cultivated ground as well. In my experience lawn damage comes from the birds and animals that feed on them - in our case our Beagle, Nellie. She has taken to sniffing these out and digging them up for a snack. Now my wife thinks these skills are apt for an entomologists dog, but our lawn is rapidly turning into something resembling the the Somme and I would rather she used her nose and digging ability to find something more lucrative - truffles would be nice.
    • Report Abuse
    • "Now my wife thinks these skills are apt for an entomologists dog, but our lawn is rapidly turning into something resembling the the Somme and I would rather she used her nose and digging ability to find something more lucrative - truffles would be nice."

       

        Maybe you could get her (the dog, not your wife!) on a truffle-hound training course?

      • Report Abuse
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 3, 2011 3:04 PM (in response to Edith)
    Re: Translucent caterpillar - what is it?

    In some countries people eat beetle larvae - apparently they are nice toasted!  See for example the page from this site: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/life/insects-spiders/collecting-and-conserving/ct-scan-rhino-beetle/index.html  It says:

     

    "Larvae of rhinoceros beetles are fat white grubs, which bore in rotten wood, humus and compost. In many parts of the world they are collected as a high protein food, and in parts of Africa they are used to make an edible oil that is rich in unsaturated fats."

    • Report Abuse

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked by (0)

What the symbols mean

  • "correct" answer available
  • "helpful" answer