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3614 Views 8 Replies Last post: Aug 24, 2013 9:53 PM by joshscales RSS
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May 16, 2011 12:48 PM

Could anyone identify this newt, approx 11cm?

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    May 19, 2011 10:06 PM (in response to Steph Bell)
    Re: Could anyone identify this newt, approx 11cm?
    What a confusing set of photos. I'm stumped. A Palmate with the tip of its tail missing perhaps.?
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    Jun 5, 2011 2:29 PM (in response to Steph Bell)
    Re: Could anyone identify this newt, approx 11cm?

    Hi Steph,

     

    I have assumed this is in the UK? There are only 3 newt species; this looks like a Smooth newt (Triturus vulgaris), but I don't know if it's a female or a male outside breeding season. It can be distinguished by its throat spots which are absent in both male and female Palmate and Great crested newts. In the breeding season the male Smooth newt develops a continuous crest along its body and tail.

     

    regards,

    emg

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      Jun 5, 2011 2:55 PM (in response to emg)
      Re: Could anyone identify this newt, approx 11cm?
      I think that this is a very odd looking newt for the UK.  There is something about it that is wrong for both Palmate and Smooth newts.  I have collected  all three UK newts before in considerable numbers and have never had an identification problem before in or out of breeding colours.
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        Jun 5, 2011 4:08 PM (in response to Lewis)
        Re: Could anyone identify this newt, approx 11cm?

        Hello,

         

         

        I have been following this thread for a long time without daring to say what I think, because I felt I would make a fool of myself. But here I go, because it haunts me: I think it could be a hybrid between the Smooth Newt (Triturus vulgaris), from which it has the spots on its belly, and the Alpine Newt (Mesotriton alpestris, or Ichthyosaura alpestris, or whatever it’s called today). This would explain its overall appearance an the lack of crest in its aquatic phase.

         

        It may seem like a long shot, but where I am from (Eastern Romania), there is a place where a hybrid population used to thrive in a small lake and around it, so I know it’s not impossible.

         

        Regards,

         

        Florin

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      Aug 24, 2013 9:53 PM (in response to Steph Bell)
      Re: Could anyone identify this newt, approx 11cm?

      a population isolated from both other newts and from most predators as its in a town could certainly produce these differences to the native newts as there's virtually no natural selection occurring, this is really interesting i found similar when i introduced woodlice to a vivarium i kept frogs in for after just 2 years i had the normal black woodlice, but mottled black and white ones, mottled black and terracotta ones, completely terracotta ones which are clearly very different to the wild population

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