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Whale, dolphin and porpoise strandings

11 Posts tagged with the live_stranded tag
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My line manager Brian is currently out picking up a harbour porpoise that live stranded in Essex over the weekend. Thanks to BDMLR,  Rosie and all those at the Wildlives  Rescue Centre for holding the animal for us, I know PM is never the out come you want (when rescue is the alternative) but hopefully we'll be able to find out why it stranded.


We also had a white beaked dolphin strand in Kent, sadly again BDMLR did all they could but couldn't save it so it's over to us. BDMLR have been little stars with this one as they have also delivered the animal to IoZ for post mortem. I'm afraid I don't have any names of the wonderful people that did this as the Project manager was dealing with it (and he's currently in Ireland) but a massive thanks to who ever you are!


(Should just add a quick note to keep the boss happy and say if you find a dead dolphin on the beach, please don't bung it in the back of a car and drive to London. BDMLR marine medics have all been trained and fully understand the health and safty issues involved in moving a cetacean!)

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179 animals in 39 days, that's a lot of work! Things seem to be easing up a bit now though, thank goodness!

 

 

“We saved more of them than we normally do,” she said. “Of the 179 only 71 were found alive and we successfully released 53 so that’s a 75 percent success rate. That was really high. In a great part that’s due to our fantastic volunteers and our ability to get to the animals quickly.”



Read more: Dolphin rescuers glad the tide of Cape Cod strandings is over - - Wicked Local Eastham http://www.wickedlocal.com/brewster/news/x587877869/Dolphin-rescuers-glad-the-tide-of-Cape-Cod-strandings-is-over#ixzz1oROEaORK

 

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A bit of an ongoing story here, back in November a dolphin was rescued near Alabama, the area has seen a massive increase in strandings recently, see my previous posts here: Further on the Gulf Coast strandings.

 

Well it appears the dolphin, named Chance is still alive and seems to be healing well although still has a long way to go. Sadly the write up doesn't tell us much about the strandings which have now been declared a "Unusual Mortality Event."


GULFPORT, Mississippi -- A nearly dead dolphin found in Alabama in November is recovering at the Institute for Marine Mammal Studies and yielding data that may help explain 630 dolphin strandings that have occurred in the northern Gulf of Mexico since February 2010.

 

Moby Solangi, director of the institute, said he is not at liberty to talk about details of what has been discovered as the dolphin named "Chance" has been nursed back from the brink of death after being rescued Nov. 24 from near a marsh at Fort Morgan.

 

"What we can say is it has revealed some significant information," Solangi said.

 

"Finding this live dolphin was like finding the black box from an airplane after a crash," he said.

 

 

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Source: http://blog.gulflive.com/mississippi-press-news/2012/01/dolphin_found_in_alabama_is_yi.html

 

 

 

Massive fingers crossed for Chance and I hope they can work out whats happening and put an end to it soon!

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Another pick up

Posted by Strandings Officer Dec 8, 2011

A little while ago CSIPs head honcho Rob went to Devon to get a dolphin and came back with 3 5 post mortem animals for 2 trips this time he went and only came back with the one, standards are obviously dropping (just joking boss!).

 

We got wind of a live strandings over the weekend from BDMLR, the local coastguard and one of my favourite volunteers David J. Despite some local surfers staying in the water with the common dolphin for what sounds like hours, the local vet had to make the hard decision to put the animal down. I know everyone on the scene worked really hard to keep the animal alive and were understandably disappointed at the outcome. It’s not the perfect end to the story but hopefully our post-mortem will help answer some questions about why the animal had to die.

 

David J just emailed me this picture of one of the guys trying to save the dolphin, such a shame it didn't work out.

 

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A few weeks ago I put up a post about the unprecedented numbers of bottlenose dolphins stranding off the Gulf Coast Dead dolphins still a concern on Gulf Coast

 

Further to this story, a live animal has been found, this will give the researchers a good chance to study the animal and hopefully see if they can untangle whats going on. Fingers crossed 'Chance' as the locals have named it, survives!

 

Four more dolphins washed up on the shores of the Gulf of Mexico this week. For coastal residents from Louisiana to Florida, the beached animals are a familair sight: hundreds of decomposing dolphin carcasses have turned up over the last two years.

 

But last week, Alabama residents came across a stranded dolphin that was still alive, though badly injured.

 

Moby Solangi, director of the Institute for Marine Mammal Studies in Gulfport, Miss., where the rescued dolphin is being cared for and studied, said the discovery presented the institute’s first opportunity in two years to examine a live dolphin that was ill.

 

The researchers hope that studying the dolphin will yield clues to the principal cause of the die-off. “People in Alabama call it Chance,” Dr. Solangi said of the survivor

 

 

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Source: http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/12/01/among-hundreds-of-dead-an-intriguing-survivor/

 

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I think New Zealand must see the most strandings of pilot whales (pure guess work, not based on data) and sadly there has been another one. 31 confirmed dead so far, this on the back of 22 sperm whales stranding in Tasmania.

 

THIRTY-one pilot whales were confirmed dead today as the lives of 34 others hung in the balance after a mass stranding on a peninsula at the north of New Zealand's South Island.


The remote location of the stranding meant rescuers were unable to help the marine mammals and their survival will depend on the tide, the Department of Conservation's area manager John Mason told the Nelson Mail.

 

 



Not much info so far but read more here: http://www.news.com.au/breaking-news/dozens-of-whales-dead-after-mass-stranding-in-new-zealand/story-e6frfku0-1226195572623#ixzz1dt0QiU9Z

 

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We are getting rumbling rumours of a second sei whale stranding (no jokes about buses please), this time in Scotland. There was definitally a stranding yesterday but the species ID is a little uncertain.

 

Details are all a bit vague, but I believe it was a live stranding that unfortunately died. I'm sure our Scottish team will be involved in the postmortem, the last one was quite badly decomposed so getting details wasn't very easy, sounds like this one should be better.

 

Its a big shock if its is a sei, to get 2 in a year is unheard of but 2 in a week....

 

Edit - chanced seemed a bit slim, the animal has been confirmed as a fin whale. It can often be the case that if you get a rare stranding every other stranding for a week or so after is reported as that species, I guess its in peoples minds.

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I've not updated for a few weeks as I've been on holiday and we've had a bit of a busy run of things.

 

A live stranded harbour porpoise on the Isle of Wight was picked up for pm by our team http://www.islandpulse.co.uk/b2/british-divers-attempt-to-rescue-porpoise-8756/

 

I went to Dorset on Friday to pick up another porpoise that stranded in Dorset last week, a massive thank you to Dave and Dorset council for all their help!

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Sadly its unlikely to survive, as is all too often the case.

 

 

A male sperm whale, the world's largest predator, has beached itself on the Cunnigar Strand in Dungarvan.

The incident follows numerous sightings of the cetacean off the south-east coast over the past 24 hours.

Andrew Malcolm of the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG) said this afternoon that the whale, around 10m in length, was "still very much alive".


SpermWhaleBeachedDungarvan19082011TWITTERPIC.jpg

Read more: http://www.breakingnews.ie/ireland/sperm-whale-beaches-itself-in-dungarvan-517187.html#ixzz1VZAgI3zyli

 

 

UPDATE: Sadly this animal didn't make it, and unfortunately it looks we may never know why it stranded in the first place - http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2011/0822/1224302806444.html

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News article about the sowerbys beaked whale CSIP pm'd, as mentioned in an earlier post.

 

“We won’t know why she ended up in the North Sea and then stranded at Thornham but she wasn’t very old so she may have been separated from her mum and then couldn’t find her way home.

 

“It would’ve been completely hopeless to try to re-float this whale in this situation because she was far away from home and in a poor condition. She wouldn’t have survived for much longer.”

 

He added: “In the water these whales are weightless but once they are on land they cannot support their own body weight. They have a lot of heavy muscle and tend to crush themselves and eventually their lungs collapse.”

 

 

Source: http://www.eveningnews24.co.uk/news/sad_end_for_stranded_whale_found_off_norfolk_coast_1_995405

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Just this second got back from picking up a porpoise that was reported as live stranded in Ulrome. A MASSIVE thankyou to Tanya who was an amazing help with this animal (and who also has an absolutely beautiful baby girl).

 

The animal was male, and incredibly fresh as you can see in the photos. Hopfully the animal will be pm'd in the next few days but I know the boys at the Zoo are shattered after a long night pming a sowerbys beaked whale! Busy here at the moment.

 

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Photo courtesy of Tanya

 

 

As always I'll post up cause of death, if known in a few weeks time when the pm results come back.

 

UPDATE: Cause of Death Category: Pneumonia, Parasitic.