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The Council of State has introduced a ban on the import of dolphins for entertainment purposes but has rejected a ban on them being kept in captivity, which means that current captive animals won't have to be released.

 

The Liberal Green deputy Isabelle Chevalley has managed to ban the import of dolphins into Switzerland with the help of Sea Shepherd Switzerland and the Swiss Cetacean Society-SCS.

 

Sea Shepherd Switzerland and the Swiss Cetacean Society-SCS have actively supported the Liberal Green deputy Isabelle Chevalley in her Swiss parliamentary motion calling for the ban on the import of dolphins into Switzerland.

 

On the 12th of this month, the Liberal Green deputy Isabelle Chevalley provided members of parliament with a briefing document drawn up jointly with Sea Shepherd Switzerland and the Swiss Cetacean Society.

 

On the 13th of March, following her convincing debate, the deputy succeeded in having her motion on the ban carried with 112 votes for and 60 against.

 

The Council of States then enforced the ban on the import of dolphins into Switzerland, but nevertheless rejected a ban on their captivity. The two associations are concerned by the fate of three dolphins, a mother and her two youngsters who are still being held in captivity in Switzerland’s sole dolphinarium, the  Connyland. This park organised a rave party last November, following which two dolphins died, raising the death toll of dolphins in Switzerland to eight in only three years.

 

The Connyland will reopen on the 31st of March and the show with the three dolphins will resume.

 

 

Direct from the Sea Shpherd website: http://www.seashepherd.org/news-and-media/2012/03/24/victory-for-the-dolphins-in-switzerland-1359

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There are some very confusing and contradictory stories coming through about the mass strandings going on in Peru. I have done some digging and this seems to be the best source for information https://lists.uvic.ca/pipermail/marmam/2012-April/004248.html

 

I’ve highlighted some of the main points below:

 

Numbers are always uncertain in these cases but it sounds like several hundred animals have washed up in the last month, with still more coming in. The strandings have taken place on the southern border of Illescas National Park, in Piura state.

 

Peru strandings.bmp

 

There are 2 species involved, Long beaked common dolphin (Delphinus capensis) and Burmeister’s porpoise(Phocoena spinipinnis).  Unoffical figures put strandings numbers as high at 3000 animals (these figures may be taking a larger area and/or time frame in to account), although these more offical figures show less with dolphins have taken by far the largest hit of around 600 dead animals, with numbers of porpoises being much lower at around 20 animals. They are all in various decomposition states but they all seem to have washed up with in the last 5 weeks.

 

The necropsies performed on site show two main causes of death (although they are waiting for further results, so this isn’t conclusive yet), most of the results seem to be leading towards a potential epidemic outbreak of morbillivirus brucella (which has been linked to many mass stranding events, including in Europe in the 90s) with some animals showing signs of acoustic impact and decompression syndrome.

 

 

 

 

 

In related but other news, the Cape Cod strandings Cape Cod strandings finally easing seems to still be dwindling on (even though the end of the mass stranding has been announced), but sadly still no results.

 

So far no patterns have emerged, but the many lab analyses will take months to complete, we may yet find one.

 

 

 

Source: http://www.ifaw.org/us/news/stranding-update-no-patterns-depleting-resources-yet-teamwork-still-prevails