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Watch our project leader doing a post mortem on a common dolphin.

 

THIS IS NOT FOR THE FAINT HEARTED!!

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/video/2011/dec/16/watch-postmortem-beached-dolphin-video

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Today the UK Cetacean Stranding Investigation Programme have issued a new leaflet about the programme with a handy identification guide on the back. The leaflet gives information about why we collect information about stranded animals and the sort of information we collect. It also lists many of the organisations which help in the project

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The ID guide illustrates the common animals that strand around the shores of the UK

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If you would like a copy you can download one at:

http://ukstrandings.org/CSIP_leaflet.pdf   or if you need multiple copies please contact us at strandings@nhm.ac.uk

 

 

 

Also today they have published their report for the 6 year period 2005-2010. This summaries the 3400 strandings that have been reported to CSIP over the 6 years. However we believe that some animals are not being recorded and encourage everyone to give us details of stranded cetaceans (and turtles, seals and basking sharks) using the freephone number 0800 6520333 or the email strandings@nhm.ac.uk

The report can be downloaded from the DEFRA website:

http://randd.defra.gov.uk/Document.aspx?Document=FinalCSIPReport2005-2010_finalversion061211released[1].pdf

 

It is DEFRA who finance the project in England,with the Scottish and Welsh goverments supporting the project in Scatland and Wales respectively. Without this funding CSIP would be unable to their valuable work.

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Woo!

 

I particularly like this bit ‘"The porpoises have found a way to not only avoid the ships, but it's also the noise they make," says Keener.

 

Harbor porpoises haven't been seen in San Francisco Bay for more than 60 years. But now, they're coming back through the Golden Gate in growing numbers and researchers are trying to understand why they’re returning.

 

 

 

 

 

The best place to look for them is 220 feet above the water on the pedestrian walkway across the Golden Gate Bridge. That's where Bill Keener of Golden Gate Cetacean Research photographs them, holding a massive telephoto lens over the side of the railing.

 

 

 

"There's a porpoise right there, coming very, very close," he says pointing. A dark shape appears in the water. It's a harbor porpoise, coming up for air. "And here's a mother and calf coming straight at us."

 

 

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Source: http://blogs.kqed.org/newsfix/2011/12/05/after-60-years-porpoises-return-to-san-francisco-bay/

 

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Another pick up

Posted by Strandings Officer Dec 8, 2011

A little while ago CSIPs head honcho Rob went to Devon to get a dolphin and came back with 3 5 post mortem animals for 2 trips this time he went and only came back with the one, standards are obviously dropping (just joking boss!).

 

We got wind of a live strandings over the weekend from BDMLR, the local coastguard and one of my favourite volunteers David J. Despite some local surfers staying in the water with the common dolphin for what sounds like hours, the local vet had to make the hard decision to put the animal down. I know everyone on the scene worked really hard to keep the animal alive and were understandably disappointed at the outcome. It’s not the perfect end to the story but hopefully our post-mortem will help answer some questions about why the animal had to die.

 

David J just emailed me this picture of one of the guys trying to save the dolphin, such a shame it didn't work out.

 

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In this post  Fin whale in Co Sligo Ireland I mentioned that a dolphin had been discovered in a salt walter lake in Ireland, sadly according to the IWDG's website, it looks like the animal didn't find it's way back to sea after all.

 

IWDG have received a report from local whale watch expert, Colin Barnes, that he has just seen a dead dolphin washed up on the island on Lough Hyne this morning 1/12/11. He described it as a medium sized animal, and can confirm that it is a common dolphin.

 

This sighting brings to a close the mystery as to whether this animal succeeded in returning to open ocean. Alas, this outcome was predictable, and is yet another reminder that cetaceans are at high risk when they venture out of their "normal" habitats. Lough Hyne can now claim another first, as it can now add to its first cetacean sighting, its first cetacean stranding; albeit of the same individual.

 

Thanks to everyone on IWDG's facebook page who took a big interest in this story.

 

Source: http://iwdg.ie/article.asp?id=2507

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A few weeks ago I put up a post about the unprecedented numbers of bottlenose dolphins stranding off the Gulf Coast Dead dolphins still a concern on Gulf Coast

 

Further to this story, a live animal has been found, this will give the researchers a good chance to study the animal and hopefully see if they can untangle whats going on. Fingers crossed 'Chance' as the locals have named it, survives!

 

Four more dolphins washed up on the shores of the Gulf of Mexico this week. For coastal residents from Louisiana to Florida, the beached animals are a familair sight: hundreds of decomposing dolphin carcasses have turned up over the last two years.

 

But last week, Alabama residents came across a stranded dolphin that was still alive, though badly injured.

 

Moby Solangi, director of the Institute for Marine Mammal Studies in Gulfport, Miss., where the rescued dolphin is being cared for and studied, said the discovery presented the institute’s first opportunity in two years to examine a live dolphin that was ill.

 

The researchers hope that studying the dolphin will yield clues to the principal cause of the die-off. “People in Alabama call it Chance,” Dr. Solangi said of the survivor

 

 

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Source: http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/12/01/among-hundreds-of-dead-an-intriguing-survivor/