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Biodiversity initiative

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Mar 20, 2015 A big welcome to our new trainees | ID Trainers for the Future

Welcome to the first blog post for the Museums Identification Trainers for the Future project! This exciting new project centers around 15 work-based traineeship positions that will be hosted at the Museum and has been designed to address the growing skills gap in species identification in the UK. We will be doing this by targeting species groups where there is a lack, or loss, of ID skills in biological recording.

 

Our first group of trainees started with us this month, having come through a very competitive selection process, and were selected from over 400 applications. Choosing our first cohort has meant we have had to make some difficult decisions: certainly by the standard of the 25 we invited to selection day back in January, there are some very capable and enthusiastic people out there, with everyone who came along performing extremely well. Hopefully that, of course, means great things for UK biodiversity and biological recording!

 

http://www.nhm.ac.uk/resources/natureplus/images/life-sciences/id-trainers/Our-first-cohort-of-trainees.jpg

Our first trainees taking part in the Identification Trainers for the Future project

L-R Sally Hyslop, Michael Waller, Katy Potts, Anthony Roach and Chloe Rose

 

Sally, Katy, Michael, Chloe and Anthony will be introducing themselves in their own blog posts which will appear here over the next few weeks, so I will save mentioning more about their backgrounds here. They have a very busy year in front of them getting involved in our work in the Angela Marmont Centre for UK Biodiversity as well as working with our specialist curation teams and helping out at Field Studies Council centres across the country.

 

They will be building their own species identification skills through a wide range of workshops, field visits and private study and later on we will be looking at building their communication and teaching skills so they can pass on to others what they have learnt, which is the priniciple purpose of our new project. In the mean time they will also be out and about at various Museum events throughout the year, and we will be reporting back on those too as soon as we can.

 

For now that leaves me only needing to say a big welcome to all our trainees, I look forward to working with you over the next 12 months!

 

Steph West

Project Manager - Identification Trainers for the Future

 

The ID Trainers for the Future project is sponsored through the Heritage Lottery Fund’s Skills for the Future programme and is supported by the Field Studies Council and National Biodiversity Network Trust.

 

For more information, see our website

Mar 9, 2015 South Georgia’s glaciers and microbial diversity

Our team went on a one month field expedition to South Georgia at the beginning of this year, funded by the National Geographic Society to collect water, sediment, ice and snow samples from glaciers around South Georgia.

 

South Georgia is located south of the Antarctic Convergence and its mountainous landscapes are dominated by glaciers. More than 150 glaciers can be found on South Georgia, and until recently glaciers have been seen as abiotic features, but now it is known that they contain diverse ecosystems with rich communities of bacteria, cyanobacteria, microbial eukaryotes, Archaea, fungi and microfauna even sometimes insects.

 

South Georgia is located in a zone that will likely be affected by climatic change, which could lead to a further decline of glacial ecosystems. In our project we will therefore do a detailed documentation of the biology and biodiversity found on glaciers on South Georgia using a combination of environmental (eDNA), culture isolation and sequencing. The project is a collaboration between Dr Arwyn Edwards and Tris Irvine-Fynn (Abyerystwyth University), Dr David Pearce (Northumbria University) and me based at the Natural History Museum.

                                             IMG_2258.jpg

Heaney Glacier.

 

IMG_1467.jpg    Nordenskjöld Glacier.

 

IMG_1643.jpg

Calving glacier front.

Mar 6, 2015 The Microverse: MidKent College get swabbing

MidKent College are one of the 140 schools and community groups to take part in The Microverse so far. We asked two of their students, studying for a BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Science, to tell us what got them excited about microorganisms, DNA and taking part.

 

microversegroup.jpg

The team at MidKent College pausing for a group photo while collecting microbial specimens for The Microverse.

 

Here's Emmanuel Shobande:

 

We were informed about the Microverse project during a lesson and a majority of the class took a keen interest in what Alison, our lecturer, was saying. On the day, every member of the class went outside to collect biological samples from one side of the college building.

 

I took interest in the project as I wish to study Biomedical Science at university, so collecting data and analysing it is something I take an interest in. The course involves lots of research and analysis of data, so this project would be a great way to enhance my CV, thus making me more employable when applying for a job/placement.

 

But what inspired me was the fact that the data that I collected was going to be published and used for DNA analysis, which could help scientists identify the types of microorganisms with potential nutrient deficiencies, those living in wet/dry conditions and those which are housed in areas of high pollution from different areas and on different buildings. For scientists to say that they are to travel the whole world and swab every building for living microorganisms would be a very time-consuming and expensive task, which is why we, as future scientists, have been given such a great opportunity to get involved in the collection of data, which could one day help identify a new form of microorganism which may not have been studied prior to the project. Who knows, our data could one day be quite essential!

 

EmmanuelShobande.jpg

Emmanuel Shobande, studying for a BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Science

 

And now for Max Squires:

 

To be part of an actual scientific project has helped me gain a range of microbiological skills which will help me with my Biomedical Science course at university. It has made me feel like an actual scientist by helping to gather data which will be analysed and be part of informative research about the microbiological life within urban ecosystems. As part of this, my class swabbed the exterior college building to hopefully identify the types of microorganisms that live in similar conditions across the UK.

 

This project has got me thinking of the life of microorganisms in urban environments. In built up environments, such as the college building which was swabbed, there are not many nutrients for microorganisms to thrive, there are high levels of pollution which can affect how microbes thrive and different weather conditions in which the microbes are exposed to (rain, hot weather, snow, etc.).

 

Could the high levels of pollution, possible lack of nutrients and harsh weather conditions inhibit microbiological life? In theory, microbes thrive in warm, moist, oxygen-rich environments and if one thinks about it, urban environments provide these factors, so it is very likely to find microbes in urban environments. Identifying specifically what microbes live in these environments will help us map out where each different microbe lives and possibly identify many new biofilms, which can give us an idea how microbes interact with each other to thrive.

 

It has been a great opportunity to be part of this research. It feels great knowing that an actual sample I collected will be analysed by top scientists and will be used in actual scientific research! It has got me thinking of the life in urban environments on a microscopic scale and has allowed me to develop my practical skills in science giving me a good start at university and in the future.

 

MaxSquires.jpg

Max Squires, studying for a BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Science.

 

The Microverse is a citizen science project, suitable for A-level Biology students or equivalent, and also community groups. The project takes you out of the classroom to gather microorganisms for DNA analysis, as part of our cutting edge research into the biodiversity and ecology of the microbial world. Free to participate, you can find out more at: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/microverse/

Biodiversity staff

Research

Alfried Vogler (lead)

Paul Eggleton (tropical entomology)

Alex Monro (tropical botany)

Neil Brummitt (spatial biodiversity)

Martijn Timmermans (genomics)

 

Collections

Max Barclay (entomology)

Beulah Garner (entomology)

Jackie Mackenzie-Dodds (molecular collections facility)

 

UK Biodiversity

Angela Marmont Centre

John Tweddle (citizen science)

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