Skip navigation

Microbial biodiversity

2 Posts tagged with the icebergs tag
0

We had the opportunity to carry out sampling on several peninsulas such as Barff, Greene and Thather Peninsula. We were keen to visit as many sites possible for a good geographic coverage, to gain a better understanding of the spatial distribution of microbial taxa, richness and community composition.

 

We are also interested in glacial meltwater run-off on microbial biodiversity, therefore we collected samples near several of South Georgia's glaciers including Harker, Nordenskjöldand Heany Glaciers.


IMG_8289.jpg

Nordenskjöld Glacier, Barff Peninsula


IMG_8491.jpgHeany Glacier, Barff Peninsula

 

IMG_8625.jpg

Penguins wandering onto Heany Glacier


 

IMG_8630.jpg

A Meltwater stream at Heany Glacier

 

We were able tohike to many ofour sampling sites on Thather Peninsula, but in order to get toGreene and Barff Peninsula, we had to be taken by boat. The boat trip were always great as we would get quite close to some of the big icebergs and constaintly cracking and carving glaciers.

IMG_8951.jpgIcebergs near Nordenskjöld Glacier


 

DSCF1286.jpgBoat officers getting a RIB boat ready

 

DSCF1281.jpgWe are getting ready for the boat trip

 

DSCF1300.jpgInside the Harbour Launch


IMG_8265.jpgBoat journey to Barff Peninsula

 

During our multi-day field trips, we would stay at the lovely well-equipped field huts that are maintained all over South Georgia.

IMG_8581.jpgThe hut at St Andrew's Bay

 

IMG_8578.jpg

IMG_9034.jpgThe hut at Greene Peninsula

0

On the fifth day, we saw the shores of South Georgia for the first time. We had the chance to go on land first time in Stromness Harbour, which contains the ruins of one of the many former whaling stations found in South Georgia. It was a great opportunity for us to collect our first samples. We also had a chance to admire some of the wildlife, that is so common for the shores of South Georgia.

 

Stromness Harbour is also famous for its importance in the rescue of the members of the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition led by Sir Ernest H. Shackleton on the Endurance. Here in Stromness Bay, Shackleton's party finally reached the first human settlementafter their 36 day crossing of South Georiga, and could organise the rescue of the rest of the expedition members from Elephant Island.


IMG_7813.jpgFirst views of South Georgia

 

IMG_7841.jpgShackleton Valley

 

IMG_7832.jpgWater sampling of astreams that is fed by several meltwater streams running of the snow covered slopes of the surrounding valley


IMG_7825.jpgRuins of whaling station and moulting king penguins


IMG_7846.jpgGentoo penguins with chicks


IMG_7856.jpgFur seals and king penguins


IMG_7855.jpgFur seal pups

 

After visiting Stromness Harbour, we also had the chance to get on shore at Jason Harbour, where we were greetedby the as usual slighty grumpy fur seals. We also saw a blonde fur seal that are seals with very pale coloured fur, apparently 1 in 1000 seals is a blonde variant.

IMG_8005.jpg

IMG_8006.jpg

Jason Harbour


IMG_7986.jpg Blonde fur seal

 

We also saw some elephant seals. Many elephant seals molt during this time of the year and they love doing it by laying on top of each other in smelly mud holes, so called wallows. There were also plenty of reindeer in Jason Harbour, which were introduced to South Georgia during the whaling era.

 

IMG_8014.jpg


IMG_8007.jpgReindeer in Jason Harbour

 

We passed several incredible icebergs in between Stromness and Jason Harbour.


IMG_7927.jpg

IMG_7903.jpgIMG_7939.jpg

Icebergs in coastal water of South Georgia