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3 Posts tagged with the belemnite tag
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Saturday and Sunday at the Lyme Regis Fossil Festival were busy in the tent. Lots of people swarmed around our fossil table to see the invertebrates and sharks on display, talk to our experts and get their own fossil finds identified.

 

Adrian Glover was showing off his ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle), sending it out into the sea to get live images of the sea floor! Alex Ball was showing people the wonders of the scanning electon microscope and the meteorites team were explaining impacts using pink gravel.

 

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Laetitia Gunton launching "REX" the ROV and Adrian Glover controlling from inside the tent.


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Just some of the Museum scientists at work on Saturday.

 

Martin Munt, Emma Bernard and I were also called upon to do a live link-up with the Nature Live studio back at the Museum, to talk about the fossil festival and going fossil hunting. We took along a selection of specimens to help us talk about some of the things that can be found in Lyme Regis.

 

David Nicholson was live in the Attenborogh Studio with Ana Rita and some specimens from the collection we selected last week. Our filming took place at the Cobb (harbour) in glorious sunshine. This did however mean that both Emma and I got slightly sunburnt! If you do come down, make sure you've got plenty of sun cream.

 

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Martin being interviewed for the 12.30 show (top). Me and Emma talking about a nautilus and a shark with Charlotte for the 2.30 show (below).

 

It's not just specimens on display - outside you can visit a pliosaur cinema and go on the Jurassic airline!

 

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The Pliosaur Cinema!

 

We also had some special guests come along to talk to us: Mary Anning and Charles Darwin! (well...people dressed as them at least).

 

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Mary Anning and Charles Dawrin.

 

Today is the last day of the fossil festival and its looking like is will be another busy day in the tent with lovely weather and lots of people on the beach eating ice cream.

 

We hope you have enjpyed reading this blog and hope to see you next year at the festival!


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Yesterday, we went to a secondary school in Dorchester. We set up our stand along with several others from the Museum, local fossil groups and the school's fossil club. At our stand we were giving students a brief explanation of taxonomy (how you classify all living things), specifically cephalopods.

 

We explained the difference between three major groups of cephalopod: ammonites, belemnites and nautiloids. The belemnite phragmacone we found yesterday proved to be very useful in explaining how a belemnite dealt with buoyancy control. The children enjoyed examining the recent nautilus we had with us to locate the hole for the siphuncle.

 

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Zuzanna Wawrzyniak and Emma Bernard with our taxonomy stand (Zoe Hughes as photographer)

 

After the school event we returned to Lyme Regis to help set up the tent for the main event: the Fossil Festival. Our main earth science table is set up, with specimens for the public to handle starting today. We constructed the Baryonyx skull and helped David Ward set up his shark sieving activity.

 

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Nearly finished setting up in the tent (with the Baryonyx spine and skull on the left)

 

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David Ward setting up the shark sieving (to find fossil teeth, etc).

 

Today is the primary school day and we have been told approximately 600 children willl be visiting - wish us luck and we will report back soon!

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We arrived on Tuesday, set up what will be our home for the week, with a stream babbling under.

 

We spent today visiting fossil shops and talking to the owners to see what was on offer and meet the collectors. We then went to the Lyme Regis Museum to talk to our colleagues there about new specimens and the local geology. Whilst there Emma had some fun dressing up as Mary Anning, the 'Princess of Palaeontology'.

 

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Emma dressed as Mary Anning with a newly acquired Ichthyosaur skull.

 

In the afternoon (after an ice cream by the sea) we set off for Seatown where we learnt about the geology and did a little fieldwork. The geology is the upper Lower Lias (about 185 Million years ago) - it is a marine setting with lots of belemnites and ammonites.

 

We found lots of bits of belemnite, but the highlight was definitely finding a phragmocone of a belemnite; the cone-shaped structure that housed the creature's internal organs. Of the ammonites, Aegeroceras was the most common find. However we did find part of an Amaltheus (My favourite Jurassic ammonite because of its rope-like keel).

 

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Seatown in the glorious sunshine.

 

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One of the many ammonites (Aegeroceras) we found

 

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Emma and Zoe in the field at Seatown.

 

Tomorrow we are heading off to a secondary school event in Dorchester to explain the wonders of cephalopod taxonomy. Now we are heading off to grab some well earned dinner! Come back to read more about our adventure!