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Field work with Nature Live

1 Post tagged with the panama tag
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Last night we had lentils instead of beans and I almost cried with joy. They were amazing and had small pieces of pork nestling in the juice. Yum...

 

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A bit of yeti red-eye going on there!
(Click images to see them full size)

 

I have been given a nickname by Daniel, our Costa Rican collaborator. He is known as Santa - to be fair, that is his actual name (he’s Daniel Santa Maria) - and I am now known as ‘Yeti’ - due to my large boots.

 

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Daniel amused himself no end with jokes about collecting Yeti footprints for the Museum. My Spanish is too poor to be clever in the response so I’m accepting my fate: I am the mythical giant of the Himalayas with huge boots.

 

In the night we were woken by an earthquake - it felt quite gentle (we were sleeping on the floor) but this report shows it was actually quite strong!

 

I was sleeping so deeply that my main emotion was one of annoyance at being awoken rather than fear. Still, an experience none the less!

 

We got up early, had a second bash at the lentils and set off for our collecting site for the day – Cerro Tararia. The walk was incredible, a lot of scrambling up and down.

 

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This place is amazing, a rocky outcrop with views that stretch for miles.

 

 

We are 2,730 metres above sea level and our coordinates today are N 09 08 52.0 W 082 58 02.7 (click to see on a map).

 

The sound is a little obscured at times in the film above due to the wind (sorry about that), but you can make out Alex saying that Panama isn't far from where we are, and the border is visible on the map linked above.

 

The views from the top are stunning.

 

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Species of the day is a member of the genus Schultesia. Daniel is not sure whether it is a new species or not but he has never before seen a Schultesia with purple flowers as they are normally white.

 

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Alex and Neil were discussing what it could be pollinated by and decided it was probably bats. The flower’s pistil and stamen are quite a long way apart from each other and it has a long tubular corolla, so a bat’s long tongue would be the perfect tool!

 

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We are just debating whether to sleep on the rock or walk back to the camp. Sleeping out here would be incredible. I’ll let you know if we did or not tomorrow!