Skip navigation
0

Lost World 10am 6 April - Allen (1).jpg

 

Charlotte Coales will be your roving reporter, writing daily blogs and keeping you updated on life in the rainforest, giving you an insider’s view on the research and sampling techniques being undertaken by our Museum scientists.


Following a BSc in Ecology and Environmental Biology and an MSc in Science Communication, Charlotte gained work experience at the BBC Natural History Unit before working as a researcher at Natural History New Zealand.  Returning to the UK, Charlotte worked as an explainer at London Zoo before getting a job at the Natural History Museum on the Nature Live team.  She regularly hosts public events with Museum scientists and loves working at the museum and being surrounded by animals, she just wishes they weren’t all dead!


Earlier this year, Charlotte took time off work to travel to South Africa and Botswana, where she trained to be a Safari Guide.  She loved spending time outdoors and learning more about Africa’s incredible plants and animals but is glad to be back at the Museum.  She can’t wait to explore the rainforests of Borneo and will be revealing some of the incredible things our Museum scientists discover.

 

 

Tony-nature-plus2.jpg

Tony Vinhas is the media technician going to Borneo with Charlotte. His primary role will be to operate the satellite equipment, cameras, etc. so that you can see live and pre-recorded videos of what the scientists are researching while they are there.


Tony is really excited about getting out there and being able to capture footage from one of the most beautiful and biodiverse areas on the planet. He’s most looking forward to hopefully seeing Orang-utans, Sumatran rhinos and clouded leopards. He’s least looking forward to the leeches and mosquitoes.

 


0

The scientists I will be following over the next couple of weeks are already out in Borneo and working hard.....

 

Photos2 033.jpg

Dan Carpenter likes soil, so it is lucky that he works in the Soil Biodiversity Group in the Life Sciences Department of the Natural History Museum. Having completed a BSc in Wildlife Conservation, he went on to do a PhD in Soil Science jointly at the University of Reading and the Museum and studied earthworms and their effects on mineral weathering in soils.  He is now a Post-doctoral Research Assistant and he has been studying diversity patterns of soil invertebrates and their role in ecosystem processes.

Dan is particularly fond of earthworms, so much so that he played a large part in setting up the Earthworm Society of Britain and sits on its committee.  When he isn’t digging holes, Dan likes running around in mountains and swimming. He is also a member of the Berkshire Lowland Search and Rescue team, so he is a handy person to know if you get lost!

pitfall traps.jpg

Kerry Leigh studied Biology at university before moving to London.  After originally volunteering in the tropical butterfly house at the Natural History Museum, she began volunteering with the Soil Biodiversity Group, spending time in the New Forest with Dan and his team sampling different habitats. The enthusiasm of everyone in the group rubbed off on her and she’s been helping out in the lab ever since, sorting and identifying various invertebrates that the group have collected.


When not in the Museum, Kerry  works in a little butterfly house in West London where she looks after caterpillars, pupae and butterflies, and sends some of them off to other exhibitions. She loves travelling (particularly in Africa) and her favourite country is Sierra Leone, she hopes to move there one day and build a hostel and restaurant on a beautiful beach! 

Keiron.jpg

Keiron Derek Brown has been volunteering in the Soil Biodiversity Group of the Natural History Museum for over 2 years.  A biology granduate, with field work experience in the tropics, Keiron decided his dream was to work in the field on zoological projects and conservation.


Keiron's time at the museum has been spent looking down a microscope to sort and identify invertebrate samples that he helped collect on field trips to the New Forest.  In his spare time he enjoys going on courses to learn more about the amazing wildlife that live across Great Britain and is also a member of the Earthworm Society of Britain. Over the summer he has been working for the Bat Conservation Trust where he provides advice to many different kinds of people for all things bat-related! Keiron has always wanted to visit the island of Borneo and is excited about experiencing life in the rainforest.

 

Day 12 PIC 3.JPG

Holger Thues is a curator at the Natural History Museum. His focus is on lichenised fungi and their associated algae which makes him a part mycologist / part-botanist. Before he came to the NHM , he was working partly as a researcher and partly as an environmental consultant. This included work with lichens, mosses and seed plants but also with various animal groups:  from aquatic invertebrates, leafhoppers to hamsters and salmon.


Holger's previous fieldwork has been mostly all over Europe (particularly “rocky” habitats from coastal cliffs to alpine peaks – you can easily locate him in the field by the sound of his chisel). In the tropics so far two field trips to the Venezuelan part of the Andes (focussed on freshwater habitats in open areas with Paramo-vegetation) and earlier this year a month in the mountains of Costa Rica.


One of his hopes for this trip is to collect a rich selection of fresh lichen material from areas which have never been studied by lichenologists before such as the Maliau Basin and to enhance the collections both in Sabah and for our museum with poorly known taxonomic groups which will become a resource for further studies by researchers in Malaysia, at our museum and for other collaborators across the world.